The forecast for the pheasant hunting season? Well, it’s better

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Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Editor’s note — The following is an article written by “Pheasants Forever” an organization that employees Brandon Wilmoth of Wellington. Pheasants Forever is dedicated to the conservation of pheasants, quail and other wildlife through habitat improvements, public awareness, education and land management policies and programs. Submitted to Sumner Newscow — Pheasant hunting in Kansas should be fair to locally good this year. Pheasant densities had been slowly but surely recovering between 2013 -2016 with a few areas reaching relatively high densities. A late spring blizzard across much of western Kansas in 2017 reduced nesting success resulting in a decline in the 2018 pheasant crow survey.This was largely attributed to declines in the Southern High Plains region hit hardest by the storm.Over-winter precipitation was limited this year resulting in short wheat and concern for nesting prospects. Heavy spring and summer showers greatly improved vegetative cover for nesting later in the season, but also limited nest success. These conditions shifted peak pheasant hatch later into June and July than normal.Excessive rain delayed wheat harvest—which typically benefits pheasant production—but short wheat limited the usefulness of this cover this year. Roadside counts indicate that we are likely to see a below-average pheasant population this year.  The combination of heavy cover and an estimated later peak hatch may have reduced the number of detectable birds on the counts, but generally survey conditions were ideal.Last year Kansas reported the second highest pheasant harvest in the country. Despite reduced numbers, Kansas continues to maintain one of the best pheasant populations in the country and the fall harvest should again be among the leading states. The best areas this year will likely be in the northern half of the Kansas pheasant range with areas of high densities also found in central and far southwestern regions.Here is region-by region pheasant summary, preceded by a map of Kansas’s upland game bird zones.SOUTH-CENTRAL PRAIRIESPheasant hunters should expect a fair to good season this year. The spring crow survey indicated a decline from 2017. However, the summer roadside survey showed a slight increase and was the only notable improvement from last year. Pheasants will be readily found in the traditional areas of the region. Based on roadside surveys, opportunities are expected to remain similar. The highest pheasant densities will be in the northern tier of counties along the border of the Smoky Hills region.NORTHERN HIGH PLAINSPheasant hunting opportunities should remain fair to good, but there will be fewer birds in the area than last year. The spring pheasant crow survey index was the highest regional index this year but remained below-average for the region. There was a significant decline in the regional pheasant index on the roadside survey this year compared to 2017. Production was assumed to be negatively impacted by heavy rainfall throughout the summer, which was confirmed by ongoing research in the region. The highest densities will be found in the northern half of the region, particularly the northeastern counties.SMOKY HILLSPheasant hunters should expect fair to good opportunities throughout much of the region. The spring crow survey saw a slight decrease, followed by a decrease in the summer roadside counts. Despite this decrease, the Smoky Hills had the highest regional roadside density in the state. Regional harvest estimates were highest in the Smoky Hills last year but are expected to decrease with decreased densities. The northern half of the region contained the highest roadside counts; however, counties in the southwestern portion of the region along the border of the South-Central Prairies observed good counts as well.GLACIATED PLAINSOpportunities will remain poor with hunting opportunities existing only in pockets of habitat, primarily in the northwestern portion of the region or areas managed for upland birds. Spring crow counts this year declined from 2017.  Roadside surveys showed increases; however, only 2 routes observed pheasants in 2018. Pheasant densities across the region are typically low, especially relative to other areas in central and western Kansas.FLINT HILLSThis region is on the eastern edge of the primary pheasant range in Kansas and offers limited opportunity.  Pheasant densities have always been relatively low throughout the Flint Hills and the highest densities are typically found on the western edge of the region. While the spring crow counts remained stable this year, the summer roadside survey had limited observations and indicated a decrease. The best opportunities will be found in the northwest portion of the region along the Smoky Hills.SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINSPheasant hunting will remain fair to good, with bird numbers similar to last year. The pheasant crow index decreased this spring after heavy spring snowfall impacted nesting success in 2017. Roadside surveys showed slight declines in the region, after heavy rainfall throughout spring and summer likely decreased production. The highest densities will be in the western half of the region where the rainfall wasn’t as extreme.Follow us on Facebook.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more

Wellington Police Notes: Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018

first_imgWellington Police notes: Thursday, October 11, 2018•12:17 a.m. Officers took a suspicious activity report in the 1000 block W. 8th, Wellington.•12:20 a.m. Officers responded to a domestic dispute in the 400 block E. Maple, Wellington.•7:38 a.m. Officers responded to a battery of a known juvenile suspect in the 200 block W. Peach Tree Lane, Wellington.•2:22 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to a vehicle in the 2000 block E. 16th, Wellington.•2:47 p.m. Officers investigated criminal damage to tires in the 1400 block E. 16th, Wellington.•3:20 p.m. Juvenile male, 17, Wellington was issued a notice to appear for disobeyed stop sign.•8 p.m. Fonda Stroup, 47, Belle Plaine, was issued a notice to appear for defective headlight.•8:55 p.m. Injury accident on private property in the 2000 block E. 16th, Wellington involving a vehicle operated by Michelle R. Rausch, 46, Wellington and a fixed object/concrete light column owned by Walmart, Wellington.•10:34 p.m. Officers conducted a report of a noise complaint in the 1000 block W. College, Wellington.•10:49 p.m. Officers responded to a report of a mental subject in the 1100 block E. Harvey, Wellington.last_img read more

Runaway cats won’t go far but may be hard to find

first_imgLOS ANGELES | If a scared dog bolts from home, it’s likely to run as fast and far as it can. But if a house cat panics, it’s more likely to slink away and stop at the first good hiding place it finds.Because the getaway is so different, the search has to be, too, said Nancy Peterson, cat programs manager for the Humane Society of the United States and a registered veterinarian technician.Don’t run to a shelter or post signs right away, she said. Immediately after you notice your pet is missing, search your yard, contact neighbors and show a photo to mail carriers, delivery drivers and paperboys.“Most cats that escape or leave home won’t go more than five houses away, so you should go to neighbor homes and ask if you can check their backyards,” she said. “If the cat does get further, it’s because a dog or another cat chased it. Unfortunately, the farther away it gets, the harder it is for it to get home.”The search for your feline friend tends to be tougher going than if you had lost a dog, experts say. Good Samaritans often come to the rescue of dog owners, picking up pooches and making a call to the owner or taking them to a shelter. But there is no cavalry for cats, and domestic ones are not easily caught — you can’t just open a car door and coax it to hop in. But you can protect against the loss of your cat by microchipping it and strapping on an ID collar.Even long-lost cats can be found, a joy that Mickey and June Wilson experienced. When an 8,700-acre wildfire came close to their Santa Barbara, Calif., home in May 2009, the couple grabbed their cat Morris and evacuated.For one night, they stayed in a motel in Buellton, about 45 miles northwest of Santa Barbara.When Mickey Wilson went to get luggage from the car, Morris, rambling freely in the second-story room, escaped. Wilson searched everywhere, following several tips, but came up empty-handed.Heartbroken, Wilson and his wife returned home the next day without Morris. Relatives went up a few times after that to look but could not find the cat.Four months later, Wilson got a call from a woman who found Morris behind a restaurant at a feral cat feeding station. The station is run by Catalyst for Cats, Inc., a group of volunteers trying to control the feral cat population in Santa Barbara County by trapping, sterilizing and returning and then feeding wild cats in the area.“Owned, lost cats show up at feeding stations more often than one would imagine,” said Marci Kladnik, a Catalyst for Cats volunteer and columnist for the Cat Writers’ Association.Morris was in good shape except for the tip of his tail, which was broken.“If he hadn’t had a name tag on his collar, we would never have seen him again,” said Wilson, a retired aircraft engineer.Wilson had to put Morris down about six months ago because of bladder problems. “He was a special cat,” Wilson said. “And we enjoyed him up to the very end.”Morris’ discovery shows even a long search isn’t hopeless.“Don’t give up! Cats can return home months after being lost,” Orange County Animal Control spokesman Ryan Drabek said. But he says that most of the cats the facility takes in each year are feral. Only a third of them are domesticated, he said.But there’s always hope if a cat has ID, said Dr. Karen “Doc” Halligan, author and chief veterinary officer of the Lucy Pet Foundation.“Both my cats have breakaway collars, tags and microchips. That is something all cat owners need to do for their cats,” she said.If a lost cat doesn’t find its own way home the first night, broaden the search. Start checking shelters, post fliers and sign up on all the lost-pet apps available online.“Don’t wait too long,” said Peterson of the Humane Society. “Cats are creatures of habit. If they disappear one night and don’t reappear by the next, something is probably wrong.”If you find your cat, it will probably be skittish.“For a cat, danger comes from above so don’t stand over a cat. … Talk to it gently. Pet it, pet it, pet it, pet it,” said Kladnik, the author.At home, “the cat will be glad to get there. It might be a little needy and will purr and purr. Go back to your normal routine. That’s what the cat wants,” she said.Online:— www.catalystforcats.org— www.humanesociety.orgCopyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

Review: Small life enhancements come with Apple Watch

first_imgNEW YORK | Apple Watch isn’t so much a lifestyle revolution as it is a collection of small enhancements that add up.Apple’s smartwatch has a wider range of apps than rival watches from Samsung, Motorola and others. In my few weeks with one, I’ve been following my favorite baseball team more closely. I’ve walked to places without staring at a phone screen for directions. I’ve stepped away from my desk more often — despite my annoyance at the watch for nagging me to move.You’ll find ways to use it if you decide to spend $349 or more on one, though that isn’t saying you absolutely need one. Think of it as a Swiss Army knife with a collection of tools that don’t seem necessary — until you find yourself using them. FILE – In this Sept. 9 2014 file photo, an Apple Watch featuring a Mickey Mouse face is tried out during an event in Cupertino, Calif. Apple Watch won’t give you revolutionary lifestyle changes. Rather, you get a collection of small enhancements that add up, along with conversation starters with friends and strangers. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) FILE – In this Sept. 9, 2014 file photo, Apple Watches displaying various modes of its exercise tracker app, Activity, are on display during an event in Cupertino, Calif. Apple Watch won’t give you revolutionary lifestyle changes. Rather, you get a collection of small enhancements that add up, along with conversation starters with friends and strangers (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File) FILE – In this April 10, 2015 file photo, a customer tries on an Apple Watch at an Apple Store in Hong Kong. Apple Watch won’t give you revolutionary lifestyle changes. Rather, you get a collection of small enhancements that add up, along with conversation starters with friends and strangers. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung, File)center_img FILE – In this March 9, 2015 file photo, the Apple Maps app is displayed on an Apple Watch during an event in San Francisco. Apple Watch won’t give you revolutionary lifestyle changes. Rather, you get a collection of small enhancements that add up, along with conversation starters with friends and strangers. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File) INFORMATION SNACKINGNotifications are central to the watch experience, whether that’s a new message, breaking news or a score change involving the New York Mets. In some cases, I can dictate a reply or select a pre-written response. The current temperature appears on my chosen watch face with Mickey Mouse. I glance at the watch throughout the day, but I need the phone for anything deep.Though I like not having to constantly pull out my phone, I have to resist feeling that everything’s urgent. When the watch dinged during a massage, I held out for just a few seconds before the temptation to check took over. It was easier to resist with the phone in the backpack. It’s a tricky balance getting the watch to enhance your life, rather than take it over.PASSES AND PAYMENTSWith Apple Pay on iPhones, I’m able to leave my wallet in my pocket to pay at several chains, including McDonald’s and Whole Foods. With the watch, I’m able to leave my phone in the pocket, too.The watch can also generate barcodes for Starbucks’ payment card, Fandango movie tickets and boarding passes for some airlines. I don’t have to fish for paper or a phone while carrying luggage or popcorn. But if the merchant’s scanner isn’t hand-held or adjustable, you might have to twist your wrist to align the barcode with the scanner. Wrists might not fit at all under scanners designed for paper.STAYING HEALTHY … AND BEING LAZYApple Watch tracks calories burned and minutes of exercise. It also pushes you to stand up and move around throughout the day. Three colorful rings display your progress, turning fitness into a game. Apps from outside parties offer additional features, such as the route you ran.All three pulse readings during an emergency-room visit Tuesday matched the watch’s (Tattoos can disrupt the heart monitor, though). A quick tap with Apple Pay paid for my cab there.I was worried that promised battery life is just 18 hours, given that I tax the watch with heavy exercise. But I haven’t had problems as long as I charge it overnight. It doesn’t track sleep, as other devices do.Offsetting the health benefits: I can control video on Apple TV instead of getting up to grab the physical remote. I can also control the phone’s camera for selfies. Parents with kids can set timers remotely for Nick Jr. and PBS Kids — and end arguments over screen time and bedtime.EXPECTATIONS RAISEDIn many cases, I need to assemble features from multiple apps. For walking and driving directions, Apple’s Maps taps my wrist when it’s time to turn. But it doesn’t do transit. Citymapper does, but lacks turn-by-turn navigation to get to the subway. It’s back to Apple Maps for that.There is no Facebook or any Google apps yet, though you get notifications that normally go to the phone. Facebook’s Instagram is available and lets you like photos, but limits commenting to 24 emoticons.I’m continually learning about new apps, including Evernote for dictating reminders and other notes. It’ll take time for app developers to write the capabilities and for me to discover them. It’ll also take time to fully get used to all the gestures and controls, though I was much better at it after a few days.I have to remind myself that the Apple Watch is a first-generation product that’s giving me a lot I didn’t have before. With other smartwatches, I’m happy just to get basic functionality. Apple Watch is good at the basics, so I’m now demanding more.last_img read more

Cooking on Deadline: Roasted tomatoes deepen gazpacho flavor

first_imgI could eat quarts of gazpacho all summer long. When I set about making this version, the goal was a gazpacho with great, fresh tomato taste, but even deeper flavor.The solution was simple: roast the tomatoes first.The sweet, layered result is well worth the slight extra hands-off time it took to bake them. If you feel like your tomatoes are perfect, then skip the roasting and get right to the chopping.You can use peppers that are all the same color, but the blend of hues won’t be as varied. You also can swap in one green pepper; some people love their slightly more bitter flavor.In a perfect world, all of the vegetables in a gazpacho might be finely diced, and look pretty and symmetrical. I don’t happen to live in a perfect world, and I happen to love my food processor, so I just use that to pulse the vegetables in batches so they chop evenly. Is it as pretty as dicing? Nope. Does it taste as good? Yup.What to do with all of that extra time? I’m sure you’ll find something good.This April 18, 2016 photo provided by Katie Workman shows roasted tomato gazpacho in New Milford, Conn. This dish is from a recipe by Katie Workman. (Katie Workman via AP)ROASTED TOMATO GAZPACHOStart to finish: 1 hour plus chilling timeServings: 6-812 plum tomatoes2 tablespoons olive oil1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar1 teaspoon sugar1 teaspoon kosher salt2 seedless cucumbers, skin on, cut into 1-inch chunks1 red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces1 yellow bell pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces1 red orange pepper, cut into 1-inch pieces1 red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces6 scallions, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces2 to 3 cups tomato juice3 tablespoons white wine, champagne, or white balsamic vinegarHot sauce to taste1. Preheat the oven to 400 F. Spray a rimmed baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray, or lightly oil the sheet.2. Cut the tomatoes in half lengthwise and place them cut side up on the prepared baking sheet. Drizzle them evenly with the olive oil and the vinegar, and then sprinkle them with the sugar and salt. Roast them for about 45 to 50 minutes, until they are lightly caramelized and starting to collapse.3. Add half of the tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, onion and scallions into the food processor. Pulse to chop the vegetables as finely as you would like them in the finished soup. Turn the chopped vegetables into a bowl, and repeat with the remaining vegetables. Remove half of this batch of chopped vegetables to the bowl, and then let the food processor run for about 20 seconds until the remaining couple of cups of vegetables are pureed. Add those to the bowl.4. Add the tomato juice and vinegar, as well as hot sauce to taste. Stir, and adjust the salt and pepper as desired. Refrigerate the soup for at least 2 hours, and up to 2 days. Serve chilled.Nutrition information per serving: 137 calories; 44 calories from fat; 5 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 464 mg sodium; 22 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 10 g sugar; 4 g protein.Katie Workman has written two cookbooks focused on easy, family-friendly cooking, “Dinner Solved!” and “The Mom 100 Cookbook.” She blogs at https://www.themom100.com/about-katie-workman/last_img read more

Samsung’s quick fix for Galaxy Note 7 is no full recharge

first_imgSEOUL, South Korea | Samsung plans to issue a software update for its recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that will prevent them from overheating by limiting battery recharges to 60 percent.The front page of the Seoul Shinmun, a South Korean newspaper, carried a Samsung advertisement on Tuesday announcing the software update for any users of the Note 7 who may be disregarding its recall notice and continuing to use the smartphone.FILE – In this Sunday, Sept. 11, 2016 file photo, customers wait for recall of their Samsung Electronics Galaxy Note 7 smartphones as powered-off Galaxy Note 7 smartphones are displayed at the company’s service center in Seoul, South Korea. Samsung on Tuesday, Sept. 13, 2016, plans to issue a software update for its recalled Galaxy Note 7 smartphones that will prevent them from overheating by limiting battery recharges to under 60 percent. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)“It is a measure to put consumer safety first but we apologize for causing inconvenience,” the advertisement by Samsung Electronics said. The update for South Korean users will start Sept. 20, it said.South Korean media earlier reported the software update plan, citing Samsung.It was not clear when the update may be issued overseas. Also unclear was whether it will be forced on existing Note 7 phones regardless of user consent. Yonhap News Agency reported that Samsung is in talks with mobile carriers to deliver the same update to keep battery power at 60 percent or below at all times.Samsung plans to begin issuing new Note 7s with batteries it says will not be prone to overheating starting Sept. 19 in South Korea. It recalled 2.5 million of the devices just two weeks after their launch after dozens of cases in which batteries exploded or caught fire. Samsung says the problem stems from a manufacturing glitch in the batteries.Samsung is the world’s largest smartphone maker, and analysts said the recall may leave a larger impact on its brand than earlier estimated. Aviation regulators and airlines have deemed the Note 7 a flight hazard and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is considering an official product recall.The company has urged consumers to immediately turn off the phones and get them replaced with the new Note 7.But implementing such a large-scale recall is a challenge. Consumers have to visit Samsung service centers or retailers twice — once to get a replacement phone — not a Galaxy Note 7 — and have a safety check of their existing Note 7, and a second time to get a new Note 7. South Koreans are traveling for one of the two biggest national holidays of the year starting Wednesday, which complicates the recall plan.Samsung offered free pizza to apologize to workers at mobile carrier shops who have been handling the unprecedented recall. Some will work during the holidays this week as Samsung plans to keep its service centers open.Lee In-tae, an employee at a SK Telecom shop in central Seoul, said two pizzas were delivered to the shop during lunchtime on Tuesday with a letter from Samsung that included an apology for causing inconvenience with the recall. South Korean media said Samsung gave free pizzas to all employees at local handset shops and mobile carriers.“We ate the pizza among a few of us,” Lee said by phone. He and his co-workers have been handling complaints from Note 7 consumers. “We have to do all the recalls here, do all the work and listen to all the bad things. But it feels like (Samsung) is trying to make up for it with that,” he said, referring to the pizza.Samsung did not answer emails and calls seeking comment on Tuesday.Analysts said the software update appears to be a last-ditch effort to contain the crisis.Samsung “has to contain the battery explosions but people are not returning the phones,” said Peter Yu, an analyst at BNP Paribas. “It is taking a desperate measure.”Keeping the battery level low could reduce the risk of overheating, but would be equivalent to getting a downgrade of a top-of-the-line phone, said Kim Young Woo, an analyst at SK Securities. The Galaxy Note series are among the most expensive handsets made by Samsung.“It means that the phone has not been optimized before the release,” Kim said.Canada issued a recall notice on Monday.The company did not say how many more battery fires in the Note 7 have been reported since Sept. 1, when 35 cases were confirmed. In announcing its recall, the Canadian government said one case was confirmed in Canada while Samsung received more than 70 reported cases in the United States alone.Follow Lee on Twitter at twitter.com/YKLeeAPHer work can be found at https://bigstory.ap.org/content/youkyung-leelast_img read more

Asian tableware: from Zen to zany

first_img This undated photo shows a mug from Miya Company. Cats are a popular motif in Asian tableware, symbolizing good luck. This mug comes with its own little kitten spoon. (Miya via AP) This undated photo shows a plate from Miya Company. This plate features a Japanese thatch pattern, melding traditional and contemporary design. (Miya via AP) This undated photo shows a bowl from Miya Company. The surprise of this bowl is that it’s not wood at all, but a realistically-patterned ceramic. (Miya via AP) Japan, China and Korea have a long history of creating beautiful table goods, from rustic stoneware to delicate ceramics, sleek lacquered items to whimsical serveware and utensils. This tableware is appearing more and more in decor stores on this side of the world as part of several trends: minimalism, globalism, eclecticism.Miya Company , based in New York City, imports a wide range of Japanese tableware and gifts. “We’re a third-generation family business that was started in the 1930s by my husband’s great uncle, Chosuke Miyahira,” says spokesperson Heidi Moon.center_img This undated photo shows a bowl from Miya Company. Indigo blue raindrops create a pleasing geometric pattern on this bowl that can be used for rice, cereal or soup. (Miya via AP) Miya was initially a flower shop, and then began offering tableware. Moon says its motto today is “friends don’t let friends use boring dishes,” and that whatever they sell has to be “beautiful, simple, and fun.”In the utensils department, there are fanciful tongs shaped like cat paws, and a man-shaped chopsticks holder with hollow legs so the sticks make him look like a stilt walker. In the ceramics section, there are plates and cups resembling traditional kokeshi dolls. Blue and white ceramic bowls, ideal for cereal, rice or soup, are stamped with a simple raindrop pattern, and come in sets with wooden chopsticks. There are cleverly designed mugs, too. A calico cat-shaped cup has its own little kitten spoon.From Jewel Japan, distributed by Miya, a microwave-safe series of mugs printed with modern graphics of cats, whales, or origami cranes come with handy matching lids to keep beverages warm.Cats are well represented in Asian tableware as symbols of good luck. Along with all the feline mugs, there are playful pussycats gamboling over glass and porcelain plates, and a clever cat-shaped matte black teapot, with the cat’s head becoming a cup.A striking black and white plate collection by Komon draws inspiration from traditional Japanese patterns like hemp leaves, snowflakes, arrow feathers and thatching.Run by the Lin family since 1997, Mrs. Lin’s Kitchen in Pleasanton, California, sells table and kitchen goods as well as home accessories. A collection of serveware is designed in the style of 16th century Japanese Oribe ceramics, known for their bold designs and copper green glaze. A pattern called Sunlit Forest evokes sunlight streaming through a woodland canopy at midday.There are jaunty lidded Chawa Muchi cups, traditionally used for egg custard. Painted with star flowers or clover, they’d make a pretty presentation for a sweet dessert.Children’s chopstick sets include holders shaped like pandas, cats and bunnies.Beautiful Wakasa chopsticks are made of hand-lacquered wood that’s then inlaid with shell or pearl in a design meant to evoke the clear, rippling waters of Japan’s Wakasa Bay.Forget those boring buffet platters; consider a detailed, miniature lacquerware boat or bridge on which to perch the savories or sweets. Red and gold trim accents these glossy black pieces that would bring a touch of drama to the table.CB2 has a matte-black, rustic, clay stoneware dish set comprised of a cup and saucer, bowl and two round plates with raised edges in the traditional Japanese style.And School of the Art Institute of Chicago student Louis Kishfy designed a serene little tea mug that marries a gritty, tactile stoneware base with a silken glazed cloak in white, cobalt or sky blue.last_img read more

Review: Mellencamp puts fearless touch on American classics

first_imgJohn Mellencamp, “Other People’s Stuff” (Republic Records)In his youth John Mellencamp was known to be cocky. That brashness carried him to the big stage, where he became a stadium-scale rocker with an adventurous spirit.He mostly fell short of the stature attained by contemporaries named Bruce Springsteen and Tom Petty, but he sometimes took bigger risks.Mellencamp’s fearlessness is well-represented on his latest album, “Other People’s Stuff,” a collection of cover songs, some of them American classics, from four decades of work.This cover image released by Republic Records shows “Other People’s Stuff,” the latest release by John Mellencamp. (Republic Records via AP)There’s a version of “Keep Your Eyes on the Prize,” the old civil rights anthem, which Mellencamp introduced at a White House event in 2010. Mellencamp’s gentle interpretation may surprise those not expecting such soulful notes out of a white man from the heartland.There’s also a slowed-down take on “Wreck of the Old ’97,” the iconic train song, and a Merle Travis song called “Dark as a Dungeon” that Mellencamp originally performed for a documentary about coal mining. Mellencamp’s earthy, cigarette-shaped growl conveys working-class honesty on both.There are cuts that would fit in neatly on “The Lonesome Jubilee,” Mellencamp’s finest album, with accordion and fiddle enhancing the hard-charging vibe. And there are hints throughout, in the range of songwriters he’s embraced — from Jimmie Rodgers to Robert Johnson to Stevie Wonder — that Mellencamp’s brashness sometimes takes him where others won’t go.That’s an essential truth about Mellencamp’s career that this collection reinforces with gusto — that even when the songs are not his own, the man takes chances.last_img read more

With painted faces, artists fight facial recognition tech

first_img In this photo taken on Feb. 17, 2020, artists Georgina Rowlands, left and Anna Hart pose for a photo with their faces painted. They’re two of the four founders of the Dazzle Club, founded last year to provoke discussion about the growing using of facial recognition technology. As night falls, the artists apply makeup. But instead of lipstick and eyeliner, they’re covering their faces with seemingly random geometric shapes. The group holds monthly silent walks through different parts of London to raise awareness about the technology, which they say is being used for “rampant surveillance.” (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) A mobile police facial recognition facility outside a shopping centre in London Tuesday Feb. 11, 2020, “We don’t accept this. This isn’t what you do in a democracy,” said Silkie Carlo, director of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, who are demonstrating against the surveillance. London police started using facial recognition surveillance cameras mounted on a blue police van on Tuesday to automatically scan for wanted people, as authorities adopt the controversial technology that has raised concerns about increased surveillance and erosion of privacy. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) Rights campaigner Silkie Carlo, left, demonstrates in front of a mobile police facial recognition facility outside a shopping centre in London Tuesday Feb. 11, 2020, “We don’t accept this. This isn’t what you do in a democracy,” said Carlo, director of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch. London police started using facial recognition surveillance cameras mounted on a blue police van on Tuesday to automatically scan for wanted people, as authorities adopt the controversial technology that has raised concerns about increased surveillance and erosion of privacy. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) A mobile police facial recognition facility outside a shopping centre in London Tuesday Feb. 11, 2020, “We don’t accept this. This isn’t what you do in a democracy,” said Silkie Carlo, director of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch, who are demonstrating against the surveillance. London police started using facial recognition surveillance cameras mounted on a blue police van on Tuesday to automatically scan for wanted people, as authorities adopt the controversial technology that has raised concerns about increased surveillance and erosion of privacy. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan) LONDON  |  As night falls in London, Georgina Rowlands and Anna Hart start applying makeup. Instead of lipstick and eyeliner, they’re covering their faces with geometric shapes.Rowlands has long narrow blue triangles and thin white rectangles criss-crossing her face. Hart has a collection of red, orange and white angular shapes on hers.They’re two of the four founders of the Dazzle Club, a group of artists set up last year to provoke discussion about the growing using of facial recognition technology.The group holds monthly silent walks through different parts of London to raise awareness about the technology, which they say is being used for “rampant surveillance.” Other concerns include its lack of regulation, inaccuracy and how it affects public spaces.Some 19 people attended the most recent event in the East London neighborhood of Shoreditch, and anyone can take part in the walks, in which participants have to paint their faces in a style called CV Dazzle.The technique, developed by artist and researcher Adam Harvey, is aimed at camouflaging against facial detection systems, which turn images of faces into mathematical formulas that can be analyzed by algorithms. CV Dazzle – where CV is short for computer vision – uses cubist-inspired designs to thwart the computer, said Rowlands.“You’re trying to kind of scramble that by applying these kind of random colors and patterns,” she said. “The most important is having light and dark colors. So we often go for blacks and whites, very contrasting colors, because you’re trying to mess with the shadows and highlights of your face.”A similar technique was used extensively in World War I to camouflage British naval ships and confuse opponents about the actual heading or location of the ships.To test that their designs work, they use the simple face detection feature on their smartphone cameras.“I can see that I’m hidden, it’s not detecting me,” Rowlands said, checking her phone to see her face doesn’t have a square around it.The rise of facial recognition technology is being tested and spreading in developed democracies after aggressive use in some more authoritarian countries like China.Britain has long been used to surveillance cameras in public spaces to counter security threats, and London is ranked as having one of the world’s highest concentrations of closed-circuit television cameras. But that acceptance is being tested as authorities and corporations increasingly seek to deploy a new generation of cameras with facial recognition technology while activists, lawmakers and independent experts raise concerns about mass surveillance, privacy, and accuracy.Opposition to algorithmic surveillance is not limited to Britain. Russia activists were reportedly arrested last month for holding a similar face paint protest over Moscow’s facial recognition cameras. Hong Kong pro-democracy activists routinely use face masks in street protests to hide their identities. Rights groups in Serbia and Uganda have opposed government projects to install Chinese-supplied cameras.Other designers have come up with countermeasures like sunglasses that reflect infrared light to blind cameras.“There is a movement of resistance against facial recognition that we are actively participating in and we want to kind of further initiate,” said Rowlands.Rowlands, Hart and two other artists founded the Dazzle Club in August, following news that London’s King’s Cross district — a busy transport hub where many big offices are being built rapidly — had quietly experimented with live facial recognition cameras without public knowledge or consent, sparking a backlash.London police recently started using live facial recognition cameras on operational deployments. Last week officers arrested a woman wanted for assault after the cameras picked her out of a street crowd on a busy shopping street. Police say new technology is needed to keep the public safe and images of innocent people are deleted immediately.Public attitudes to facial recognition technology in Britain appear to be mixed, according to one survey last year, which found most people said they don’t know enough about it but nearly half said they should be able to opt out.The Dazzle Club’s founders say they’re worried about the effect that the technology has on people in public if cameras are collecting their biometric data — facial images — without clearly explaining what’s being done with it.“We’re having to adjust our behavior in public space in a way that I think is problematic,” said Hart.___Read more AP stories on developments in technology at https://apnews.com/apf-technologycenter_img FILE – In this Jan. 8, 2020, file photo, people look at a display at the CES tech show in Las Vegas. U.S. senators are scrutinizing a facial recognition software company over privacy concerns and the possible sale of its services to authoritarian regimes. New York-based startup Clearview AI has drawn attention following investigative reports about its practice of harvesting billions of photos from social media and other services to identify people. Sen. Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, sent a letter to the company Tuesday, March 3, 2020. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) 1 of 6 Rights campaigner Silkie Carlo demonstrates in front of a mobile police facial recognition facility outside a shopping centre in London Tuesday Feb. 11, 2020, “We don’t accept this. This isn’t what you do in a democracy,” said Carlo, director of privacy campaign group Big Brother Watch. London police started using facial recognition surveillance cameras mounted on a blue police van on Tuesday to automatically scan for wanted people, as authorities adopt the controversial technology that has raised concerns about increased surveillance and erosion of privacy. (AP Photo/Kelvin Chan)last_img read more

Pattaya Cricket Club ease into cup final with 6 wicket win

first_imgThe PCC captain Simon ensued there were no late order travails with a composed 13no.  But it was Manik who was the star of the innings with a beautiful 54no, finishing with a glorious straight six to ensure PCC’s 6 wicket victory, the man of the match award and a place in the Grand Final on Sunday 28th January in Bangkok.PCC would like to invite any supporters to come along for a great finals day out, the details of the fixture will be advertised on the club Facebook page and website. It was an unusually hot and sticky Sunday morning at the Thai Polo Ground, the home of Pattaya CC, when the two captains strode out to the wicket for the toss.  Kerala CC won it and elected to bat first in the cup semi final with the winners facing the Southerners in the final.The PCC opening bowlers, Andy Emery and Lee Standen, started superbly as the new ball offered assistance through the air and off the wicket.  Lee made the breakthrough when Simon Philbrook held a sharp chance at a deep gully and Wezley Masterton held an even better catch at cover point.  When Venky snaffled a catch at mid off, Kerala CC were 20 for 3 and behind a par scoring rate.Peter Gangur’s (2/19) wily spin and Basu’s (1/16) inswing maintained the pressure on the opposition batsmen.  Wezley (1/25) bowled with his usual aggression that at times was too quick for the lower order batsmen and Damith Tilakaratna (0/12) continued PCC’s dominance.  A few lapses in concentration from Paul Hack behind the stumps gave KCC some respite but Lee returned at the death to mop up the tail and finish with a very tidy 4 for 22, as KCC were all out in the last over for 111.  A special mention should go to Shaun Jones who was outstanding in the field.In reply PCC made the worst possible start when Venky was beaten for pace and lost his off stump first ball.  Wezley’s (14) cameo allowed Andy to stake a claim for a regular top order spot but he soon found the pace too hot and was cleaned up also without troubling the scorers.  At the other end Manik was seemly untroubled and when he was joined by Lee the pair calmly added 44 runs to take the PCC score to 76 before Lee (16) was caught behind.last_img read more