Category: fofabvlic

Consumption of ‘Cannibal drug’ in adolescence increases risk of cocaine addiction in adulthood

first_imgShare Pinterest Share on Facebook Email LinkedIncenter_img Consumption of the synthetic drug MDPV –a powerful psychostimulant known as ‘cannibal drug’- in adolescence, can increase vulnerability of cocaine addiction during adulthood, according to a study carried out with laboratory animals and led by the researchers Elena Escubedo, from the Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences and the Institute of Biomedicine of the UB (IBUB) and Olga Valverde, head of the Neurobiology of Behaviour Research Group (GreNeC) of Pompeu Fabra University (UPF).Cocaine addiction is now a great social, economic and health problem in lots of countries around the world. Therefore, any factor stimulating the effects of its consumption should be considered, and this is the aim of the new study, carried out on mice and published in the journal British Journal of Pharmacology.Other authors of this study are the experts David Pubill, Jordi Camarasa, Raúl López-Arnau and Letícia Duart, from the Research Group Neuropsicofarmacologia dels Derivats Amfetamínics (Neuropsychopharmacology of Amphetamine Derivatives) of the UB, and Miguel Àngel Luján, from the Neurobiology of Behaviour Research Group (UPF). Share on Twitter A new design drug with effects similar to those of cocaineDesign drugs are a new generation of addictive substances which have become popular among youngsters. Methylenedioxpyrovalrone (MDPV) is an amphetamine derivative spread as a high-abuse substance with higher psychostimulant effects than those of cocaine. Regarding the effects of this drug on humans, which inhibit the collection of neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline, there is no scientific bibliography yet.The new study analyses the influence of MDPV consumption during adolescence and its impact on adults’ vulnerability in cocaine use. The breaking point reference of the experts was the similarity of MPDPV and cocaine action mechanisms, and the practically permanent effects created by these addictive substances in certain brain areas –mostly in the nucleus accumbens- and pattern response alterations when facing specific stimuli.In the research, adolescent mice were treated with MDPV during seven days. After three weeks without the substance, adult animals’ sensitivity to cocaine was analyzed under different experimental protocols. At the same time, the changes in certain proteins associated to the addictive process were also analyzed.“In the new study, we state that the animals treated with MDPV during adolescence show reinforcing behavior patterns to cocaine which are higher than the control group. Also, these behavioural changes are related to alterations of factor expression directly related to addiction. For instance, the level of the factor DeltaFosB is three times higher than the normal level and it stays high during the three weeks after removing the addictive substances from the animals”, says Professor Elena Escubedo, also member of the Research Group Neuropsicofarmacologia dels Derivats Amfetamínics (Neuropsychopharmacology of Amphetamine Derivatives) of the UB.DeltaFosB, in particular, is a transcription factor involved in neuroplasticity expressed in addictions. “Since this factor is understood as a molecular “power switch” for cocaine addiction, we think this is the essential molecule to explain a great part of this phenomenon” says Escubedo.According to Professor Olga Valverde, from the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences of the Pompeu Fabra University, “although drug use can lead to addiction at any age, the new research shows that the sooner someone starts taking drugs, the more likely s/he will develop future severe problems. Therefore, efforts have to be focused on the study of consequences of exposure to the main abusive drugs during adolescence”.last_img read more

Mine craft: Harworth Group interview

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Ringing the changes: James Dipple on the next phase in MEPC’s evolution

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Hotels forced to adapt or die

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Skills, resources and the future

first_imgSubscribe Get instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270.last_img

EU referendum: Get ready for the day after

first_imgTomorrow the UK will be waking up to the outcome of what could well be the most historically significant vote of many peoples’ lifetimes. Whatever the result of the EU referendum – and Building, from a construction industry perspective, has been a firm supporter of remaining in the union – the vote will unquestionably affect the UK’s economic direction for many years to come. Equally, whatever the outcome, the days ahead will entail a shift in the UK’s immediate economic priorities – whether that be through removing the layers of uncertainty that have clouded investment decisions over recent months; or, in the event of a Brexit, by a more fundamental reappraisal of the country’s income and spending.What is far less likely to happen, but would be refreshingly welcome, is a period of sober reflection on the way that this campaign was conducted by many of those involved – and the impact that a relentlessly adversarial, and at times, downright nasty, tone has had on the voters who ultimately have had to decide the issue at stake. Whatever else either campaign has achieved, the debate has shone an uncomfortable spotlight on an alienating, bullying tone of politics that appears to have slowly crept into mainstream UK democracy, and which has fuelled cynicism and distrust among voters at the very moment that they should be most engaged.The damaging impact of a deeply adversarial, stereotypically macho culture of engagement is something, of course, that the construction industry has been battling to overcome for decades. And although it may have passed many by amid the noise around the vote, today, 23 June, was not only the date of the EU referendum. It also happens to be the date of the annual National Women in Engineering Day – one of several initiatives that have sprung up over recent years to address the continued shortage of women entering technical professions, construction included.The damaging impact of a deeply adversarial, stereotypically macho culture of engagement is something, of course, that the construction industry has been battling to overcome for decadesThe reason why such initiatives exist is laid bare when you realise that less than 16% of engineering and technology undergraduates in Britain are female; a pattern of male dominance which is replicated across training schemes in other areas of the industry. The UK has the lowest percentage of female engineering professionals in Europe, at less than 10%. By contrast, some of those less developed European economies that have been made an often unflattering focal point of the referendum campaigns – such as Latvia and Bulgaria – have managed to reach nearly 30%. The UK’s persistent, comparative failure is surely food for thought – particularly, of course, if a Brexit leaves the country less able to fill its skills shortages by looking to the continent.The economic consequences of this week’s vote will intrinsically shape the long-term outlook for many of construction’s key sectors, in terms of the sources of funding and the pattern of demand. But whatever the outcome, the UK will still have a shortfall of housing, a shortage of school places, and a transport infrastructure that urgently needs improving if its cities are to appeal as destinations to big businesses – European or not. Construction needs many more skilled workers if it is to deliver these improvements to the built environment.It may be unrealistic to expect much to change in the tone of Westminster politics once voters become bystanders again for another couple of years. But for those in construction, with a looming shortage of skilled workers, every small effort to appeal to a broader workforce can have an immediate impact. When it comes to diversity, all businesses should say in.  Sarah Richardson, editorlast_img read more

Gebr

first_imgThe new branch will offer a wide range of services including land transport, air and sea freight, in addition to individual and special logistic solutions. “In long-lasting terms the region is supposed to be one of the strongest territories in the Czech Republic, when it comes to potentials,” commented Harald Prohaska, country manager, Gebrüder Weiss. www.gw-world.comlast_img

Norma Road Primary’s budding food garden

first_img 1 of 4 HAZEL ALLIES-HUSSELMAN Norma Road Primary School pupils, with organisations Samporele and Greenpop, got their hands dirty to plant life-giving trees on the school premises.Samporele is a Sesotho word meaning umbrella. The organisation starts and manages organic food security gardens, and is based at Norma Road Primary. It was Samporele’s co-founder, Dominique Tomlinson, who approached Greenpop, an urban greening social enterprise, to plant 20 trees at the school.Said Ms Tomlinson: “We started with the organisation last year, and this year we are at 10 schools. The people who work on the project, are parents at the respective schools. Our food gardens are especially there to help feeding schemes at poorer schools. We provide an extra three types of vegetables, in addition to what the feeding schemes normally get. With food being a scarcity, we needed to find a way to better our community. “We also wanted children to become interested in agriculture, which is so much more than just planting, as well as, introducing organic gardening into our community.” Nick Fordyce, Greenpop’s Cape Town urban greening manager, said that because of the care needed for fruit trees, they don’t normally plant them at a school the first time around, but because Norma Road had an existing food garden, they had made an exception. “We planted 10 indigenous trees and 10 fruit trees. We are keen to plant as many trees as we can, but at the same time, we also don’t want to plant the trees, for them to die when they don’t get the necessary care. Planting a tree is like caring for a pet – it requires serious care. “There is an application process for schools who would like us to plant trees, and after the application, we do a site visit to determine sustainability. We focus heavily on the areas that need trees,” Mr Fordyce said.This plant day was Greenpop’s fifth one for the year, and the organisation aims to do 50 plant days in a year.If you would like to become a Greenpop volunteer, make a contribution to give a gift of a tree, or apply for a plant day, visit the website: www.greenpop.org or call 021 461 9265.last_img read more

Solicitor welcomes London mayor’s call for new inquest into child’s death

first_imgJocelyn CockburnSource: Rex FeaturesHodge Jones & AllenLast month Jocelyn Cockburn, joint head of the civil liberties team at London firm Hodge Jones & Allen, asked Geoffrey Cox QC MP to quash the conclusion of an inquest into the death of Ella Kissi-Debrah and order a fresh inquest following research that linked pollution levels to Ella’s symptoms. Southwark Crown Court concluded in 2014 that Ella’s death was caused by acute respiratory failure and severe asthma.Khan has now written to the attorney general to say that a new inquest ‘would be extremely helpful’. Khan points out to Cox, who took over from Jeremy Wright QC MP as attorney general last month, that he ‘has the power to ask the High Court to look again at inquests where important information has not been considered’.Khan says: ‘As you may know, I am committed to improving air quality in London, achieving legal limits as quickly as possible, and then meeting even tighter World Health Organization guidelines by 2030. Cases like Ella’s are a key part of why I have attached such importance to this issue. As a result, it would be extremely helpful for a new inquest into Ella’s death to be held.’I, and others with air quality duties, need to better understand the role that air pollution may have played in order to ensure that the most ambitious measures are taken at every level of government so that – if air pollution was the cause – no other child ever again dies as a result of the air they breathe.’Cockburn thinks the attorney general ‘will find it extremely persuasive’ that the London mayor has added his weight. ‘The case for a further investigation is now overwhelming, and the new evidence about the impact of pollution on Ella’s health must be examined to see whether it was a causative factor of her death,’ she said.Cockburn believes there are strong grounds for Ella’s inquest to be quashed on the basis that her right to life, under article 2 of the Human Rights Act, may have been breached by the government’s failure to act in relation to unlawful air pollution levels. The challenge to the attorney general has been brought by Ella’s mother, Rosamund, on behalf of one of Ella’s siblings. A human rights specialist seeking to persuade the attorney general to order a fresh inquest into the death of a nine-year-old girl has welcomed London mayor Sadiq Khan’s support.last_img read more