I Hate Bingo

first_imgby, Angie Mcallister, ChangingAging ContributorTweetShareShareEmail0 Sharesphoto by Anthony Souffle photo by Anthony SouffleI hate bingo. I don’t know when it started, but I definitely have an animosity towards the game.I can remember when I worked as an Activity Director dreading the day we “had” to play bingo. I am not sure which was worse, the monotonous calling of letters and numbers paired together or the passing along of the prizes while Elders fought over who actually won and what they would get to win. Yes, if you have ever worked in a nursing home, you know what this scene looks like. I can remember walking out of a regular bingo game one afternoon thinking, “There must be more than this”.Yes, there really is more than bingo. When I look back over my career in the Activities profession, which spans a period of approximately 19 years, I see the attachment to bingo was my fault. I was the one who created the schedules, I was the one who gave the best bingo prizes ever, and I was the one who failed to recognize that Elders could do more.I think it was during this time the realization hit me that I was only a professional party planner. Bingo, endless parties, and being at the point of creating my own holidays so there would be additional reasons to “party”. Cupcakes, cookies, punch, music and balloons were my favorite recipe for the perfect activity. These things were all good and had their place but this was not “real” life.It was then that I started searching for real engagement. How could I bring more of real life to the activities I was creating and less entertainment? I realized quickly that successful engagement is built on the foundation of relationship. I needed to know the Elders. This meant going beyond the admission assessment’s 20 questions and digging deeper. What were their hopes, dreams, greatest accomplishments, and most impactful moments? Essentially, it meant listening and hearing something very valuable. I needed to learn their stories.Wow, when I started hearing those stories. I discovered how they felt when they lost their parents, when they gave birth to their first child, when they got married, when the war started, and so much more. It was then I learned they really did like bingo but they would also like teaching, community service opportunities, to plan their own parties, and opportunities to continue living life to the fullest.My perspective changed and we began to build activities that were engaging. One by one life began to change at the home. There was excitement in the air and everyone could feel it! We still played bingo but we were now also forming committees, taking trips into the community almost daily, having more spontaneous moments, and giving the gifts of fulfilled dreams like helicopter rides. This was living! I saw life forming and taking shape around me.Activities that merely “entertain” are slowly becoming a thing of the past. As culture change sweeps through the nation, we can see the value of engagement really starting to take a foothold among the activities profession. I have learned that it is engagement that spurs growth and connectedness and ultimately creates joy. Entertainment has its place but engagement is the solution to providing wonderful quality of life to Elders.Related PostsTweetShareShareEmail0 SharesTags: activities nursing homeslast_img read more

AAD encourages early detection of melanoma through skin selfexams

first_imgMay 3 2018Dermatologists encourage everyone to be a ‘Skin Cancer Hero’ by learning this life-saving behavior in conjunction with Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday®Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. It is estimated that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, every hour.In recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month in May and Melanoma Monday® on May 7, the American Academy of Dermatology is encouraging the public to be a “Skin Cancer Hero” by learning how to detect skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable. The campaign aims to save lives by teaching the public how to identify the warning signs of melanoma, perform a skin self-exam and find free SPOTme® skin cancer screenings in their area.”Skin cancer is one of the few cancers you can see with the naked eye,” said board-certified dermatologist Ali Hendi, MD, FAAD, an assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington. “Yet sadly, many people don’t know how to be their own hero when it comes to skin cancer, including what to look for on their skin or when to see a board-certified dermatologist.”To increase their chances of spotting skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable, Dr. Hendi recommends that everyone check their skin for the ABCDEs of melanoma, the warning signs of this disease: Related StoriesCollagen powder found to be effective in wound closureScientists develop accurate, wearable voice recognition deviceResveratrol found in grapes could help astronauts on Mars”While performing a skin self-exam, keep in mind that skin cancer can develop anywhere on the skin, not just in areas that are exposed to the sun,” said Dr. Hendi. “If you notice any new spots on your skin, scalp or nails, spots that look different from other spots on your body, or spots that are changing, itching or bleeding, make an appointment to see a board-certified dermatologist.”To learn more about how to detect skin cancer, visit the AAD’s SPOT Skin Cancer™ website -; SpotSkinCancer.org -; for valuable information and resources on skin cancer prevention and detection, including: SPOT Skin Cancer™ is the AAD’s campaign to create a world without skin cancer through public awareness, community outreach programs and services, and advocacy that promote the prevention, detection and care of skin cancer. The AAD designates the first Monday in May as Melanoma Monday® in order to raise awareness of melanoma and encourage early detection through skin self-exams.The public can help raise awareness of melanoma and other types of skin cancer by using the hashtag #skincancerhero when sharing AAD resources on social media, and by encouraging friends and family members to take advantage of the AAD’s free skin cancer screenings. Individuals who have been affected by skin cancer can share their personal stories on SpotSkinCancer.org to provide support and inspiration for others fighting skin cancer, and communicate the importance of skin cancer prevention and early detection. A video on “How to Check Your Skin for Skin Cancer” -; part of the AAD’s Video of the Month series, which offers tips people can use to properly care for their skin, hair and nails at home. A new AAD PSA, “Caught It,” which encourages men over 50 to be aware of changes on their skin so that they can detect skin cancer early, when it’s most treatable. A “How to Be a Skin Cancer Hero” infographic containing tips on how to spot the signs of skin cancer on yourself and your partner. How to find a free SPOTme® skin cancer screening in your area; more than 400 screenings are available nationwide in May. Source:https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/check-your-skin-for-skin-cancercenter_img Examine your entire body -; front and back -; using a full-length mirror. Then, look at your right and left sides with your arms raised. Bend your elbows and look carefully at your forearms, underarms and palms. Look at the backs of your legs and feet, the spaces between your toes, and the soles of your feet. Check your fingernails and toenails; however, make sure to remove any nail polish first. Examine the back of your neck and scalp with a hand mirror. Part your hair for a closer look. Finally, check your back and buttocks with a hand mirror. Consider asking a partner to help, as another set of eyes can be helpful for checking the back and other hard-to-see areas. A is for Asymmetry: One half of the spot is unlike the other half. B is for Border: The spot has an irregular, scalloped or poorly defined border. C is for Color: The spot has varying colors from one area to the next, such as shades of tan, brown or black, or areas of white, red or blue. D is for Diameter: While melanomas are usually greater than 6 millimeters -; or about the size of a pencil eraser -; when diagnosed, they can be smaller. E is for Evolving: The spot looks different from the rest or is changing in size, shape or color. Even if you don’t have any other symptoms, see a board-certified dermatologist if you notice one of these signs or notice an existing mole start to evolve or change in any way. “When detected early, skin cancer, including melanoma, is highly treatable, making it imperative to check your skin regularly,” said Dr. Hendi. “It only takes a few minutes to check your skin, and it could save your life.”To perform a skin self-exam, Dr. Hendi recommends the following tips:last_img read more

DiagCORE platform allows molecular diagnostic tests to be performed quickly

first_imgAug 1 2018When someone is admitted to hospital, doctors often have to treat them with antibiotics while awaiting the results of time-consuming tests, with even the most advanced microbiology culture taking several days to get results. Patients therefore stay in hospital longer than necessary and receive ineffective treatment, which increases the risk of antibiotic resistance – a major problem highlighted by the World Health Organization and the United States’ Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerBy giving a clear diagnosis, molecular diagnostic tests make it possible to treat the exact cause of an illness quickly. This prevents unnecessary antibiotic use, lengthy and costly hospital stays, excessive medical procedures, redundant doctor’s visits, prolonged illness and deaths.Based in Barcelona, STAT-Dx started out with a small team but grew quickly, partly thanks to the Horizon 2020 backing. Its DiagCORE platform allows molecular diagnostic tests to be performed in about an hour, compared with 4-6 hours using other methods.“DiagCORE offers on-demand testing, which means the instrument is ready whenever and wherever a test needs to be run,” says company co-founder Jordi Carrera. “With other methods, samples are often batched before testing and laboratories might be closed when the test result becomes available. This further delays the results needed to make critical clinical decisions.”Carrera also stresses the simplicity and safety of the system. “DiagCORE can work with most specimens without extensive offline preparation,” he says. “Our cartridge has embedded sample preparation capabilities. That simplifies and increases the security of the work of laboratory technicians and enables the platform to be directly installed in the clinical wards. They don’t need to use harmful chemicals, sharps or be unnecessarily exposed to infectious materials. It also enables less skilled people to use the system in point-of-care settings.”. Source:http://ec.europa.eu/research/infocentre/article_en.cfm?id=/research/headlines/news/article_18_08_01-1_en.html?infocentre&item=Infocentre&artid=49600last_img read more

Chalmers University professor develops new theory for origin of phantom limb pain

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 6 2018Dr Max Ortiz Catalan of Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has developed a new theory for the origin of the mysterious condition, ‘phantom limb pain’. Published in the journal Frontiers in Neurology, his hypothesis builds upon his previous work on a revolutionary treatment for the condition, that uses machine learning and augmented reality. Phantom limb pain is a poorly understood phenomenon, in which people who have lost a limb can experience severe pain, seemingly located in that missing part of the body. The condition can be seriously debilitating and can drastically reduce the sufferer’s quality of life. But current ideas on its origins cannot explain clinical findings, nor provide a comprehensive theoretical framework for its study and treatment.Now, Max Ortiz Catalan, Associate Professor at Chalmers University of Technology, has published a paper that offers up a promising new theory – one that he terms ‘stochastic entanglement’.He proposes that after an amputation, neural circuitry related to the missing limb loses its role and becomes susceptible to entanglement with other neural networks – in this case, the network responsible for pain perception.”Imagine you lose your hand. That leaves a big chunk of ‘real estate’ in your brain, and in your nervous system as a whole, without a job. It stops processing any sensory input, it stops producing any motor output to move the hand. It goes idle – but not silent,” explains Max Ortiz Catalan.Neurons are never completely silent. When not processing a particular job, they might fire at random. This may result in coincidental firing of neurons in that part of the sensorimotor network, at the same time as from the network of pain perception. When they fire together, that will create the experience of pain in that part of the body.”Normally, sporadic synchronized firing wouldn’t be a big deal, because it’s just part of the background noise, and it won’t stand out,” continues Max Ortiz Catalan. “But in patients with a missing limb, such event could stand out when little else is going on at the same time. This can result in a surprising, emotionally charged experience – to feel pain in a part of the body you don’t have. Such a remarkable sensation could reinforce a neural connection, make it stick out, and help establish an undesirable link.”Related StoriesNew computational model explores daily pain sensitivity rhythmsOpioid overdose deaths on the decline says CDC but the real picture may still be grimNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerThrough a principle known as ‘Hebb’s Law’ – ‘neurons that fire together, wire together’ – neurons in the sensorimotor and pain perception networks become entangled, resulting in phantom limb pain. The new theory also explains why not all amputees suffer from the condition- the randomness, or stochasticity, means that simultaneous firing may not occur, and become linked, in all patients.In the new paper, Max Ortiz Catalan goes on to examine how this theory can explain the effectiveness of Phantom Motor Execution (PME), the novel treatment method he previously developed. During PME treatment, electrodes attached to the patient’s residual limb pick up electrical signals intended for the missing limb, which are then translated through AI algorithms, into movements of a virtual limb in real time. The patients see themselves on a screen, with a digitally rendered limb in place of their missing one, and can then control it just as if it were their own biological limb. This allows the patient to stimulate and reactivate those dormant areas of the brain.”The patients can start reusing those areas of brain that had gone idle. Making use of that circuitry helps to weaken and disconnect the entanglement to the pain network. It’s a kind of ‘inverse Hebb’s law’ – the more those neurons fire apart, the weaker their connection. Or, it can be used preventatively, to protect against the formation of those links in the first place,” he says.The PME treatment method has been previously shown to help patients for whom other therapies have failed. Understanding exactly how and why it can help is crucial to ensuring it is administered correctly and in the most effective manner. Max Ortiz Catalan’s new theory could help unravel some of the mysteries surrounding phantom limb pain, and offer relief for some of the most affected sufferers. Source:https://www.chalmers.se/en/departments/e2/news/Pages/A-new-theory-for-phantom-limb-pain-points-the-way-to-more-effective-treatment.aspxlast_img read more

5 Times Beyoncés Body Language Spoke Volumes

first_img 4. 2019 Roc Nation Academy Awards Brunch 2019 NBA Finals - Game ThreeSource: Ezra Shaw / GettyGame 3 of the 2019 NBA Finals was notable for a number of reasons: The Toronto Raptors won a crucial away game to give them a 2-1 edge in the best of 7-game series; the co-owner of the Golden State Warriors appears to assault Raptors star Kyle Lowry in a mind-boggling moment; oh, and Beyoncé shared an awkward moment on the sidelines while an unwitting Jay-Z sat next to her seemingly unaware of the shade Queen Bey was throwing to the left via her infamous body language on Wednesday night in Oakland.READ MORE: The White Privileged Audacity Of Golden State Warriors’ Part Owner Pushing Kyle LowryThe all-world couple was positioned courtside at the game at Oracle Arena, a familiar sight for Mr. and Mrs. Carter who routinely attend NBA games. Hell, they were just living their best lives in Beyoncé’s hometown of Houston a couple of weeks ago when the Rockets lost to the Warriors. In that instance, her body language suggested blissful enjoyment as she and her husband seemed to be having a grand old time.Golden State Warriors v Houston Rockets - Game SixSource: Bob Levey / GettyFast forward to Wednesday night and things were decidedly different after video footage showed the wife of Golden State Warriors’ owner getting what may have been a little too cozy with her husband, who seems to respond with a standard level of politeness. But it was Beyoncé’s response to the woman leaning all in front of her and dangling her lifeless tresses in the Queen’s face.Beyoncé, seemingly staring off into space as a coping mechanism to for the woman invading her personal space in already tight quarters, reacted with a covert quasi nudge that likely sent the intended message received by the woman who soon left. It was an amazing scene to behold. Source:Splash News No need to show the actual footage from the infamous elevator scene, where Solange kicked Jay-Z in his nether regions for reasons that have never been officially confirmed. What has been confirmed, however, is how Beyoncé’s facial expression and body language never even provided a hint to her true feelings in the situation after the 2014 MET Gala in New York City. Source:Getty Beyoncé’s reported beef with Kim Kardashian is nothing new, but a few years back their icy relationship was the subject of speculation when they sat next to each other during Fashion Week in the Fall of 2015 in New York City. The Queen Bey’s face says it all here with her looking off into space while seated next to her husband in a near-mirror image from Game 3 of the 2019 NBA Finals.While the friendship between Jay and Kardashian’s husband Kanye West has since deteriorated, she and Beyoncé probably see little if any of each other anymore. But before then, Beyoncé, when in the same proximity as Kardashian, used to speak loudly without saying a single word. 2. Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in 2015 Source:Getty Now this is more like it. Queen Bey and her king Jay-Z held court at a brunch they hosted in Beverly Hills in February ahead of the 2019 Academy Awards. This indelible image of the two all-world superstars is indicative of the type of relationship her body language has long projected to the public: a strong, unbreakable union.Conspicuously missing from the brunch was Solange, Kanye, Kim Kardashian, Omari Hardwick and, of course, Becky With The Good Hair from Game 3 in Oakland. 1. MET Gala elevator with Solange in 2014 3. Omari Hardwick kissing Beyoncé at the 2019 NAACP Image Awards Did Omari Hardwick do too much kissing Beyoncé… twice?https://t.co/uzMypSQH4q pic.twitter.com/Y0o5HNdx06— MadameNoire (@MadameNoire) April 1, 2019 This one was vintage Beyoncé body language after she was the victim of a sneak attack by actor Omari Hardwick, who went to kiss the Queen Bey not once but twice in front of Jay-Z. There was no mistaking this body language from Bey, who looked visibly disgusted. Here we have Beyoncé in rare form! If you look closely at her left arm you will see her slightly nudge ole girl, a discrete but mighty signal saying…BACK THE HELL UP! pic.twitter.com/LGaZHJ8rIw— Kalen Allen (@TheKalenAllen) June 6, 2019The imagery was highly reminiscent of some other high-profile instances of Beyoncé flexing her body language as loudly as possible. Scroll down for four other examples of when we’ve seen Queen Bee’s body language speak volumes without her actually having to utter a single word.last_img read more

Top stories The dark triad the lost men of ancient Spain and

first_img By Alex FoxMar. 15, 2019 , 2:30 PM (left to right): Gary Waters/Getty Images; JULIO MANUEL VIDA ENCINAS; MOHD RASFAN/AFP/GETTY IMAGES Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Does a ‘dark triad’ of personality traits make you more successful?The dark side of human personality has long fascinated the public and psychologists alike. Research has linked unpleasant traits such as selfishness and a lack of empathy to a higher income and better odds of landing a date. But in a new study, scientists argue such work is often superficial, statistically weak, and presents an overly simplistic view of human nature.Men who lived in Spain 4500 years ago left almost no male genetic legacy today Top stories: The dark triad, the lost men of ancient Spain, and the race to save the pangolin The genetic legacy of men who lived on the Iberian Peninsula 4500 years ago has largely diminished—all of their Y chromosomes, which are passed from men to men, were replaced as new farming cultures swept into the region and drove them out of the gene pool. That’s one of the striking conclusions of the largest analysis of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula.These odd, scaled mammals are the most poached in the world—and they could go extinctInternational conservation groups and government agencies are intensifying efforts to save pangolins, armadillolike mammals that face a bleak future as the world’s most poached and trafficked animal. They are in demand for both their meat and their scales, believed in some Asian countries to have medicinal properties. The past 2 months have seen record-setting seizures of pangolin body parts both in Asia and Africa.Trump once again requests deep cuts in U.S. science spendingFor the third year in a row, President Donald Trump’s administration has unveiled a budget request to Congress that calls for deep spending cuts at many federal science agencies, including a 13% cut for the National Institutes of Health and a 12% cut for the National Science Foundation, while providing hefty increases for the military.New fuel cell could help fix the renewable energy storage problemTransitioning to renewable energy will take technology that can convert electricity from wind and sun into a chemical fuel for storage and then convert that fuel back into electricity. Commercial devices that do this exist, but most are costly and perform only half of the equation. Now, researchers have created lab-scale gadgets that do both jobs. If larger versions work as well, they would help make it possible—or at least more affordable—to run the world on renewables. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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To meet the Plan S openaccess mandate journals mull setting papers free

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country ILLUSTRATION: DAVIDE BONAZZI/SALZMAN ART Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Plan S, the funder-backed scheme to require free online access to scientific literature, aims to shake up the subscription journals that have long dominated scholarly publishing. Now, some publishers are considering an approach they hope will both comply with the plan and maintain their subscription income: allowing authors to post manuscripts in public archives as soon as their papers are published.Currently, most journals charge for subscriptions and keep online papers behind a paywall for at least several months. But the Plan S funders, who will release final rules this month, insist that scientists who receive their funding publish without a paywall or waiting period. One way for scientists to comply with the plan, which is backed by 15 European government funders and four foundations, is to publish in a journal that collects fees from authors to cover free access—the “gold” model of open access.Some publishers fear they wouldn’t earn enough through author fees to remain financially viable. So, according to John Sack, founding director of HighWire in Los Gatos, California, which provides web hosting for nonprofit scientific publishers, many have warmed to another compliance option: “green” open access. In that model—permitted in the draft version of Plan S, unveiled in September 2018—Plan S–funded authors could deposit free-to-read papers in public repositories without a waiting period. The journal would continue to collect subscription fees, and the mechanism could benefit some authors who lack funding to pay for gold open access. Email To meet the ‘Plan S’ open-access mandate, journals mull setting papers free at publication Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Jeffrey BrainardMay. 15, 2019 , 1:40 PM In recent months, HighWire surveyed 27 nonprofit publishers and found that they rated green open access without an embargo period more favorably than other options, including switching their subscription-based journals to entirely gold open access.”It seems like green open access would be a viable way for us to continue with the subscription model” while accommodating funder mandates such as Plan S, says Nancy Winchester, director of publications for the American Society of Plant Biologists in Rockville, Maryland, which publishes two subscription journals that offer gold open access. “We would give it serious consideration.”The draft form of Plan S allows open-access archiving of a prepublication version of an article called the author accepted manuscript. It contains changes in response to peer review but lacks features of the published version such as a designed layout, hyperlinks to referenced articles, and supplementary materials. Few publishers allow archiving a paper’s published version because it carries the most commercial value. But many, including AAAS (publisher of Science), now allow the author accepted version to appear in public repositories—such as the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s PubMed Central—albeit typically not until after an embargo period of 6 months to 12 months.Plan S requires more openness: No embargo is allowed, and publishers have to give up copyright to the freely accessible articles. Plan S calls for a “CC-BY” license, which allows others to distribute and reuse content if they simply cite the original source. Even so, some publishers judge that offering Plan S–funded authors green open access without an embargo is the least threatening option for compliance because only an estimated 3.3% of the world’s scholarly papers were written by authors who receive support from the Plan S funders and fall under its requirements. The United States has indicated it will not join Plan S, although it continues to require public archiving of federally funded papers within a year of publication; China’s funders have expressed support for Plan S’s goals but have yet to formally sign on or announce rules to implement it.At least 30 publishers already offer green open access with no embargo, although almost all retain copyright, says Stuart Taylor, publishing director for the Royal Society in London. The Royal Society, which publishes eight subscription journals that offer gold open access, adopted that policy in 2010. Last year, the society began to offer the CC-BY license.The move has not hurt business, Taylor says. “We haven’t seen any effect on attrition rates” of subscribers. “I’m convinced that’s because the final published version [of articles] is superior,” and readers are willing to pay for that.Bill Moran, publisher of the Science family of journals in Washington, D.C., says offering Plan S–compliant green open access is “an option we’re looking at.” But AAAS doesn’t know how many researchers would use that option and what its financial consequences would be, he says. Those answers might not come until 2024, when Plan S takes full effect. (Science’s News section is editorially independent of AAAS.)Other publishers think the approach would lead to a dire and unsustainable loss of subscription revenue. Selective journals employ professional editors and incur high costs even before a manuscript is accepted, says Steven Inchcoombe, chief publishing officer at Springer Nature in London, which publishes Nature. Green open access entails giving away that effort, he says, adding that its impact on subscriptions and revenue hasn’t been sufficiently tested on a large scale.Unlike some other publishers, Springer Nature views gold open access as more sustainable, Inchcoombe says. The publisher is offering “offset” deals to universities that reduce subscription fees by the amount that the institution pays to publish its scientists’ articles open access. University libraries, however, worry about the rising costs of such deals.*Correction, 15 May, 2 p.m.: This story was updated to correct a statistic; 3.3% represents not the fraction of authors who receive support from Plan S supporters, but instead the fraction of scholarly papers with such authors.last_img read more

Adding 1 billion hectares of forest could help check global warming

first_img Email J. Bastin, et. al., Science 365, 76, 2019 They analyzed nearly 80,000 satellite photographs for current forest coverage. The team then categorized the planet according to 10 soil and climate characteristics. This identified areas that were more or less suitable for different types of forest. After subtracting existing forests and areas dominated by agriculture or cities, they calculated how much of the planet could sprout trees.Earth could naturally support 0.9 billion hectares of additional forest—an area the size of the United States—without impinging on existing urban or agricultural lands, the researchers report today in Science. Those added trees could sequester 205 gigatons of carbon in the coming decades, roughly five times the amount emitted globally in 2018. “This work captures the magnitude of what forests can do for us,” says ecologist Greg Asner of Arizona State University in Tempe, who was not involved in the research. “They need to play a role if humanity is going to achieve our climate mitigation goals.”Adding forests wouldn’t just sequester carbon. Forests provide a host of added benefits including enhanced biodiversity, improved water quality, and reduced erosion. Estimates of how much forest restoration on this scale would cost vary, but based on prices of about $0.30 a tree, Crowther says it could be roughly $300 billion.Exactly how much carbon future forests could store may not be crystal clear, but Duncanson says NASA has new instruments in space—like the Global Ecosystem Dynamics Investigation (GEDI) aboard the International Space Station—that will use lasers to create high-resolution 3D maps of Earth’s forests from canopy to floor. These data will add much-needed precision to existing estimates of aboveground carbon storage. “With GEDI we can take this paper as a stepping stone and inform it with much more accurate carbon estimates,” Duncanson says. “There have always been large uncertainties on large-scale carbon totals, but we have richer data coming soon.”*Correction, 10 July, 11:40 a.m.: This story has been updated to reflect the fact that the rise in global temperatures is measured against the climate prior to the industrial revolution. Adding 1 billion hectares of forest could help check global warming By Alex FoxJul. 4, 2019 , 2:00 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img This is where the world could support new forests. The map excludes existing forests, urban areas, and agricultural lands. Global temperatures could rise 1.5° C above preindustrial levels by as early as 2030 if current trends continue, but trees could help stem this climate crisis. A new analysis finds that adding nearly 1 billion hectares of forest could remove two-thirds of the roughly 300 gigatons of carbon humans have added to the atmosphere since the 1800s. “Forests represent one of our biggest natural allies against climate change,” says Laura Duncanson, a carbon storage researcher at the University of Maryland in College Park and NASA who was not involved in the research. Still, she cautions, “this is an admittedly simplified analysis of the carbon restored forests might capture, and we shouldn’t take it as gospel.” The latest report from the United Nations’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change recommended adding 1 billion hectares of forests to help limit global warming to 1.5° C by 2050. Ecologists Jean-Francois Bastin and Tom Crowther of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich and their co-authors wanted to figure out whether today’s Earth could support that many extra trees, and where they might all go. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

Nintendos New Lineup Electrifies E3

first_imgNintendo previewed an impressive lineup of gaming content at E3 2017 this week, by many accounts. Its collection of new titles and targeted versions of some of the industry’s hottest third-party content seemed to validate surprisingly strong sales of the Nintendo Switch console.Moving easily from a living room big screen to a mobile gaming device, the Switch already has gained a significant following.Nintendo unveiled a stream of new titles from some of its most renowned video game franchises, while adding new games that are designed to work specifically for the Switch, which offers a unique gaming experience with its funky Joy-Con controllers and emphasis on multiplayer competition.Among the multiplayer titles that will be on hand this summer are Splatoon 2, Arms and Pokkén Tournament DX, the first Pokémon title for the Switch. There are a few challenges ahead, said Bailey. Nintendo may not be able to meet demand from a manufacturing perspective, for one, and it could spend the rest of 2017 supply-constrained.Nintendo will have to make sure it can drive demand for the Switch beyond its most enthusiastic fans, he cautioned, and strike a balance so that its own great new game releases don’t crowd out new titles from third-party software partners.Third-party developers are offering critical versions of popular titles designed for the Switch, IDC Research Director Lewis Ward told TechNewsWorld, including Fifa 18, NBA 2K 18, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim and Rocket League. Nintendo promised to introduce Switch owners to “glorious new kingdoms” with the Super Mario Odyssey game, the first 3D sandbox-style Mario adventure in more than 15 years.During its spotlight video presentation, the company announced several new Switch titles in development, including Metroid Prime 4. Game Freak has begun work on a core Pokémon RPG title for the Switch, Pokémon CEO Tsunekazu Ishihara teased during the Spotlight presentation — but it won’t be released before mid-2018.Legend of Zelda items will appear in the Nintendo Switch version of Skyrim, Bethesda revealed during its Showcase. During the Nintendo Spotlight, Zelda series producer Eiji Aonuma previewed upcoming DLC packs for Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. The packs, which are available for US$19.99 with the Expansion Pass, include The Master Trials, which launches June 30, and The Champion’s Ballad, slated for the coming holiday season.Ubisoft CEO Yves Guillemot announced an exclusive version of its Rabbids game for Nintendo Switch, a crossover adventure called Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle, which will debut Aug. 29.Nintendo also announced Mario & Luigi: Superstar Saga + Bowser’s Minions, which is an updated version of the Mario & Luigi series designed for Nintendo 3DS. It offers everything from the original for Game Boy Advance to an easy mode option for inexperienced players.Rocket League will be coming to the Nintendo Switch, complete with cross-network play, exclusive battle cars and exclusive local wireless multiplayer access, said Jeremy Dunham, vice president for publishing at Psyonix, and Corey Davis, its design director.Other new titles include Xenoblade Chronicles 2, which will launch during the holiday season; Fire Emblem Warriors from Koei Tecmo Games, launching this fall for the Switch, Nintendo 3DS, 3DS XL and 2DS XL; and EA Sports: FIFA 18, launching Sept. 29. Piscatella raised his forecast for Nintendo Switch sales coming out of the show, as he expected them to be strong for the rest of this year and into 2018.”What’s most exciting from a sales perspective is the knowledge that a Pokémon RPG is on the way to Switch,” he told TechNewsWorld.The sales implications from such a major title are significant, Piscatella added. “It could potentially drive multiconsole ownership per household, which makes the potential sales outlook even more positive.”The biggest unique selling point for Nintendo Switch would be to “deliver a catalog of titles that leverage its hybrid console and mobile features,” said Karol Severin, an analyst at Midia Research.Franchise titles like Pokémon and Super Mario Bros. are important, because they provide opportunities for games that can cross various gaming genres and formats, whether mobile or console, he told TechNewsWorld.Sales of Nintendo Switch have gotten off to a very strong start since its launch earlier this year, noted Steve Bailey, senior analyst for games at IHS Markit.That is due in part to the strong performance by Zelda: Breath of the Wild, which has turned out to be a “stellar return to form for the series,” he told TechNewsWorld.A robust slate of games will keep things moving for the rest of 2017, Bailey said. IHS has forecast sales of 9.5 million units, with the expectation that Super Mario Odyssey should be a big driver.The announcement of Metroid, Fire Emblem and Pokémon should leave Nintendo in “fighting form” as it “leverages its considerable IP cache” to drive support for the console, he added.center_img Nintendo, along with game developer Ubisoft, appears to have made the strongest showing overall at E3, according to Mat Piscatella, industry analyst for U.S. Games at NPD.Super Mario Odyssey could be something special, both as a game and as a driver of new hardware sales, he said. David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain’s New York Business and The New York Times. First Impressions Something for Everyonelast_img read more

New study finds only 13 of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions to be appropriate

first_img Source:https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2019/01/antibiotic-prescriptions-appropriateness/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 17 2019Study demonstrates the scale of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the USA new Northwestern Medicine study found only 13 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions were appropriate, with 36 percent considered potentially appropriate.The study, conducted with the University of Michigan and Harvard University’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, provides the most extensive assessment of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions to date and demonstrates the scale of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the U.S.Overuse of antibiotics contributes to the development of antibiotic resistance — a major public health concern — increases health-care costs and exposes patients to unnecessary side effects.The study will be published today, Jan. 16, in the journal The British Journal of Medicine (BMJ).It also found that 23 percent of outpatient antibiotic prescriptions were inappropriate and 28 percent were not associated with any diagnosis code at all — suggesting that the rate of inappropriate prescriptions may in fact be even higher.The study used a novel classification scheme and is uniquely comprehensive. For the first time, the scientists evaluated all 91,738 diagnosis codes inICD-10 (the system used in the U.S. to code diagnoses) and categorized each for antibiotic appropriateness.They also examined all outpatient antibiotic prescriptions among a cohort of 19.2 million patients, irrespective of the reason or site of care.”Most prior studies have looked at antibiotic prescribing for a particular condition or in a particular location — for example, antibiotic prescribing for acute bronchitis in the emergency department,” said co-author Dr. Jeffrey Linder, chief of general internal medicine and geriatrics in the department of medicine and the Michael A. Gertz Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “This allowed us to take a broader look at the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing than has been done before.”Related StoriesNatural antibiotic made by Tübingen researchers interacts with human defense mechanismsPlant foods may transmit antibiotic-resistant superbugs to humansFinger-prick blood test could help prevent unnecessary antibiotic prescribing for patients with COPDDespite initiatives to curb the problem, a significant proportion of prescribed antibiotics are unnecessary. However, prior studies are limited in scope and largely out of date; in particular, most relied on diagnosis codes in ICD-9, although the system was replaced with ICD-10 in 2015.In the current study, the scientists developed a new, comprehensive ICD-10-based classification scheme that determined whether each of the more than 90,000 diagnosis codes “always,” “sometimes” or “never” justified treatment with antibiotics.”No one had gone through all available codes before,” Linder said.The team then used the new scheme to evaluate 15.5 million outpatient antibiotic prescriptions filled in 2016 by a large cohort of privately insured U.S. children and non-elderly adults. The scientists assigned each prescription fill to one of four categories: either “appropriate,” “potentially appropriate,” “inappropriate” or “not associated with a recent diagnosis code.”They found that just 13 percent of prescriptions were appropriate, 36 percent were potentially appropriate and 23 percent were inappropriate. They also found that 28 percent were not associated with any diagnosis code at all — suggesting that the rate of inappropriate prescriptions may in fact be even higher.”This means that our prior methods of looking at antibiotic prescribing based on location or specific diagnosis code is missing a huge proportion of antibiotics,” Linder said.Beyond highlighting the widespread overuse of antibiotics in the U.S., the study could also help facilitate future research; the authors note that the new classification scheme could be applied to any dataset using ICD-10 codes, providing a valuable tool for scientists.last_img read more

Scientists discover new mechanism by which sleep supports the immune system

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 12 2019Getting enough sleep is vital to supporting our immune system in fighting off pathogens – so much is common knowledge. But what we don’t know is how exactly sleep affects certain immune functions. Scientists at the University of Tübingen and the University of Lübeck have now discovered a new mechanism by which sleep supports the immune system. The team led by Dr. Luciana Besedovsky and Dr. Stoyan Dimitrov from the Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology in Tübingen and Dr. Tanja Lange from the Clinic for Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology in Lübeck were able to show that the function of T cells, the white blood cells that are responsible for combating pathogens, was impaired after only three hours without sleep. The study was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.The scientists conducted a 24-hour experiment with volunteers: One group was allowed to sleep for eight hours at night, a second group stayed awake for the whole period. During the experiment, blood was regularly taken from the participants. In particular, the research team examined the binding strength of T cells to a molecule named ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), which enables them to attach to other cells, in a process known as adhesion.This is important for their function: “T cells circulate constantly in the bloodstream looking for pathogens. Adhesion to other cells enables them to migrate to different areas in the body and, for example, dock onto infected cells in order to subsequently kill them,” says Stoyan Dimitrov, first author of the study. As the study shows, the adhesion of T cells was significantly reduced in sleep deprived subjects.Related StoriesHigh sleep variability and short sleep duration predict blunted weight lossNovel bed system with VR brainwave-control for sleep blissSleep decline in one’s 50s, 60s increases risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseIn order to further investigate how sleep affects T-cell function, plasma – the part of the blood that contains soluble substances such as hormones – was taken from sleeping and sleep deprived subjects. This plasma was applied to isolated T cells for a few minutes. Plasma taken from sleep deprived subjects reduced the adhesion significantly compared to the plasma from subjects who had slept.In another experiment, the team was able to reverse this suppression of T-cell function by blocking Gαs-coupled receptors. Amongst other substances, the stress hormone adrenaline and prostaglandins, which play a role in inflammation, bind via these receptors. “This shows that even following brief sleep deprivation soluble molecules activate these receptors and thereby impair the adhesion of the T cells,” says Luciana Besedovsky, head of the study.In parallel experiments, the researchers were also able to show that some of the soluble molecules that bind to this receptor class, such as adrenaline, prostaglandins and the neuromodulator adenosine, strongly impair adhesion when administered directly to T cells. The same substances are also strongly elevated in a number of pathological conditions, such as chronic stress or cancer. “This means that our findings also have clinical relevance outside sleep research. They could explain why the immune system is suppressed in some diseases,” says Lange. Besedovsky summarizes: “Just three hours without sleep are sufficient to reduce the function of important immune cells. Our results show a potential fundamental mechanism by which sleep helps us fight infection.” Source:https://uni-tuebingen.de/last_img read more

Senate panel makes surprisingly fast work of surprise medical bills package

first_img This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente. Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 26 2019It may seem as if the Senate, or at least certain key senators, have decided on a way forward to fix the nation’s “surprise medical bill” problem. But make no mistake: The door is still open to try another solution.Members of the Health, Education, Labor and Pensions (HELP) Committee approved a sweeping measure Wednesday that tackles a range of big-ticket health care concerns. The 196-page bill touches nearly every aspect of the health care industry, from lowering the price of prescription drugs and creating a national database of health care costs, to increasing vaccine rates and preventing youth tobacco use.One thing the bill specifically does not deal with: the insurance market and the Affordable Care Act, which could be why the massive package was voted out of the committee in just over two hours with little debate. The Lower Health Care Costs Act of 2019, sponsored by HELP Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and Patty Murray (D-Wash.), the top Democrat on the panel, sailed through with a bipartisan 20-3 vote.”You don’t have to preach the whole Bible in one sermon,” said Alexander as he described his panel’s action. “We picked out one important thing: reducing health care costs.”Still, just because the first hurdle has been cleared doesn’t mean there’s room for speculation about what could happen between now and when it reaches the Senate floor. Alexander said he’s hoping the bill will be voted on before the Senate leaves Aug. 2 for a monthlong recess.The smooth hearing capped a busy few weeks, as senators debated the mechanism that would be used to stop surprise medical bills — the unexpected and often costly charges patients face when they get care from a doctor or hospital not in their insurance network.An earlier draft of the bill outlined three options to solve disputes between payers and providers. There was an in-network guarantee, where all of the health care providers at a hospital — whether the anesthesiologist or lab — must accept in-network insurance rates.Another option, often referred to as baseball-style arbitration, would have the health plan and the doctor — if they couldn’t reach an agreement on reimbursement — present to an independent arbitrator their best offers for how much a patient’s out-of-network care should cost. The arbitrator would choose between the two.But another approach — benchmarking — ultimately made it into the formal draft. Here’s how it works: When patients are seen by doctors who aren’t in their network, the insurer would pay the providers the “median in-network rate,” meaning the rate would be similar to what the plan pays other doctors in the area for the same procedure.At the markup hearing Wednesday, Alexander said he initially preferred one of the other approaches, the in-network guarantee, but changed his mind when the Congressional Budget Office said benchmarking would save more money.A group of senators on the panel led by Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Maggie Hassan (D-N.H.) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) voted for the chairman’s choice, even though they had advocated for arbitration. Cassidy made clear he continues to have reservations.Related StoriesBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryNovel vaccine against bee sting allergy successfully testedStudy: Two-thirds of pneumonia patients receive more antibiotics than they probably need”This is entirely for the insurance companies,” he said of benchmarking. “I’m surprised that my colleagues on the other side of the aisle running for president are OK with this.”Neither of the two Democratic senators on the committee running for president, Sens. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.) and Bernie Sanders (Vermont), were present but both voted no by proxy.But it is also not an entirely settled issue.Cassidy and Alexander indicated that the door was still open to including independent arbitration before the package gets to the floor.”We’re going to keep working on that the next three or four weeks. There are clearly opportunities to improve the bill and move in the direction Sen. Cassidy wants to go,” Alexander told reporters after the hearing.At the markup hearing Wednesday, the committee took a step toward Cassidy’s preferred vision for fixing surprise bills. It passed an amendment from Cassidy that would require insurance companies to post accurate lists of who is in-network, so patients have a better chance of avoiding surprise bills.”This bill is not as good as it should be,” Cassidy said. “And I thank the chairman because he has offered to work between now and floor consideration on the surprise bills.”The only other amendment approved by the panel, offered by Sen. Tammy Baldwin (D-Wis.), would require drug companies to report price increases.And despite Alexander saying early on that he didn’t want to talk about the individual insurance market or the ACA, some Democrats couldn’t let the opportunity pass without mentioning Republican efforts to undermine it.”Repairing the train can only get you so far if you are pulling up the track at the same time — and that’s unfortunately exactly what this administration is doing,” Murray said in her opening statement. “The biggest threat to families’ health care continues to be sabotage from President Trump.”last_img read more

Autonomous drones that can see and fly intelligently

first_imgDrones have been given ‘eyes’ and a new algorithm to help them fly intelligently, reaching their target position when GPS is not available. Dr. Jiefei Wang, a researcher from UNSW Canberra Trusted Autonomy Group, used an Xbox Kinect sensor as an input camera to help drones ‘see’ their environment.Jiefei developed algorithms to process the video footage image by image, to help the drones know their own speed, motion, and to detect obstacles so they can reach their target position—a completely autonomous system.”Depth information is crucial for locating objects,” Jiefei says.”Human beings can use one eye to see the world but need two eyes to locate. For example, try closing one eye, then point your index fingers towards each other and bring them together. Most people will find this difficult.”Jiefei’s algorithm uses the images the drone ‘sees’ and compares the same pixel in one image with the previous one to find the difference. Detecting the differences in 2-D images allows it to then calculate the speed and location of drones in 3-D space.”As the RGB-D cameras (such as the Kinect sensor) are still in their infancy, they still suffer from performance drawbacks such as limited operational range and relatively low resolution,” Jiefei says. Jiefei has created a system for the drones to become completely autonomous. Credit: Jiefei Wang Credit: Jiefei Wang Citation: Autonomous drones that can ‘see’ and fly intelligently (2019, February 6) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-02-autonomous-drones-intelligently.html Drones can almost see in the darkcenter_img Provided by Freshscience Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. “So, in the future, the impact of more accurate RGB-D cameras could be explored. If I have the chance in the future, I would like to come back to this. I cannot stop the wars and disasters, but as an engineer I believe in the power of technology, and we are experiencing the way how it changes our lives right now.”In future, we may be able to use the drones to help rescue people from earthquakes, help mining industries with underground detection without risking lives, and more.”last_img read more

Despite good progress 100 lowcarbon energy is still a long way off

first_imgEven with the aid of nuclear power, electricity consumption in Britain is set to increase dramatically in the coming decade. As electric cars continue their journey to the mainstream, traditional transport fuels will be replaced by electricity. The yearly energy demand of transport fuels is currently more than double the UK’s national electricity consumption. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Progress has been so quick that a fully low-carbon power sector in Britain has transformed from a faint pipedream into a real possibility, according to the CEO of one of the UK’s “big six” energy companies. Indeed, the National Grid now expects to be able to operate a zero-carbon electricity system by 2025.Already approaching that milestone on windy, sunny days, the country’s first hours of 100 percent low-carbon electricity could soon be here – but staying at 100 percent throughout the year will be much more difficult to achieve. So what does the journey to decarbonisation look like?Headwinds to decarbonisationTo paint the UK’s energy future, it is important to first understand how electricity is generated today. The graph below is a visualisation of British electricity generation in October 2018. Periods of strong wind (in red) and sun (yellow) combined with nuclear power (green) meant that on some days, more than 75 percent of electricity came from low-carbon sources. With solar prices still decreasing and the government recently agreeing a major deal for offshore wind to produce one-third of the UK’s power by 2030, the country’s first hours of low-carbon power could arrive within the next five years.But the graph also highlights the other side to the UK’s energy story. When the wind is weak and the skies dark, low-carbon sources provide less than 25 percent of electricity generation. On average, low-carbon technologies accounted for more than 45 percent of British electricity in 2018 – and almost half of that came from nuclear plants. Saying goodbye to fossil fuels quickly might mean accepting that the ever-controversial form of energy will play some role in the UK’s electricity mix in the medium term. Provided by The Conversation Walz sets goal: 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2050 This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Just one small part of the UK’s energy future. Credit: majeczka/Shutterstockcenter_img Similarly, plans to decarbonise the UK’s heat generation – currently 66 percent is generated by gas – by converting to electric heating systems will also place huge pressures on demand. During winter months, heat can consume more than three times the daily energy demands of electricity – and over a full annual cycle it constitutes 50 percent of total energy demand. Collectively, these factors will move the goalposts for 100 percent low-carbon electricity further and further away. Powering throughWhile the huge efficiency increase of electric vehicles over internal combustion engines should cushion the impact of electric vehicles on the UK’s energy future, the country will need to diversify its energy mix as much as possible to bring those goalposts back into sight. This means continued growth in wind, solar, hydro, biomass, energy efficiency and energy storage to carry the country through the calm, grey days. Precisely how much growth is needed depends exactly on the future of energy demand, but to give some perspective of scale, more than 80 percent of the total UK energy supply, including electricity, land transport and heat, still comes from fossil fuels. The tens of billions of pounds already invested in low-carbon electricity is just the start of the UK’s journey to decarbonised energy.It also means seeking alternative, non-electric methods to replace fossil fuels in heat generation. Capturing waste heat from industrial processes, geothermal heat from the ground and heat extracted from water bodies could all limit demands on the electricity sector and make it easier to achieve more low-carbon heat and power. Southampton already heats much of its city centre geothermally – and many cities can and should follow suit. Recent work published by the BritGeothermal estimates that geothermal energy alone could meet the UK’s heat demand for at least 100 years.Concerted and sustained effort from both government and individuals is required if the UK is to achieve a low-carbon nirvana in heat, transport and power. State support of the renewables industry through ensuring long-term investment security and regulations to create energy-efficient and electricity-generating new homes will be essential in the UK’s decarbonisation journey. The UK population will need to consume less energy individually, use energy more efficiently and use their voices and money to support renewable solutions. They will also need to elect representatives with a genuine ambition to decarbonise the country – rather than to commission new coal mines and fracking sites.Large-scale changes are already in motion. Shell recently stated that it wants to become the world’s largest electricity supplier and is among many oil giants investing heavily in renewables. While the need for new forms of energy presents big challenges for the UK it also offers a wealth of opportunities for the current generation to be part of an energy revolution. If the UK embraces the task, it could be joining Costa Rica, New Zealand and Norway as low-carbon powerhouses before the middle of the century. As one specialist at the start of his career and another nearing the end of his, we say bring that challenge on.Andrew Crossland, Associate Fellow, Durham Energy Institute, Durham University and Jon Gluyas, Professor of Geoenergy, Carbon Capture and Storage, Durham UniversityThis article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. Citation: Despite good progress, 100% low-carbon energy is still a long way off for the UK (2019, April 9) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-good-low-carbon-energy-uk.html British electricity generation in October 2018. Credit: Dr Andrew Crossland/MyGridGB, Author provided Explore further In the past ten years the UK’s electricity mix has changed dramatically. Coal’s contribution has dropped from 40 percent to 6 percent. Wind, solar power and hydroelectric plants now generate more electricity than nuclear power stations, thanks to rapid growth. Demand for electricity has also fallen, reducing the country’s dependence on fossil fuels. Thanks to these three factors, the carbon intensity of Britain’s electricity has almost halved, from more than 500g of CO₂ per kilowatt-hour in 2006 to less than 270g in 2018.last_img read more

Bareilly mayor municipal body lock horns over cows death in animal shelter

first_img Next Press Trust of India Bareilly (UP)July 17, 2019UPDATED: July 17, 2019 19:59 IST Represntative image: PTIThe Bareilly mayor and the local municipality have locked horns over the alleged death of 125 cows in an animal shelter run by the civic body here.Mayor Umesh Gautam charged the municipality staff with acute negligence leading to the death of around 125 cows in the animal shelter, but officials have denied the allegation.”As many as 125 cows have died in the Kanha Pashu Ashram from March to June this year because of the apathy and corruption of the municipality staff,” said Gautam.”This trend has not stopped as the condition in the shelter continues to be pathetic and all efforts to draw the authorities’ attention to the situation have failed,” he added.The mayor said when he tried to raise the matter of corruption in the management of the civic body, he was framed in a fake case.Municipal Commissioner Samuel Paul N, however, rejected the allegations, saying senior officials, including the district magistrate, frequently visit the animal shelter, which also has a veterinary doctor to examine the cattle’s health on a daily basis.The mayor, however, said he has apprised Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath of the state of affairs in the animal shelter, demanded action against those found guilty for cows’ death.ALSO READ | UP BJP MLA says cows in shelters died natural deathsALSO READ | Two held for illegally transporting cattle in Rajasthan’s AlwarALSO WATCH | How fairly are cow welfare schemes in Madhya Pradesh working?For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byPrakriti Sharma Bareilly mayor, municipal body lock horns over cows’ death in animal shelterMayor Umesh Gautam charged the municipality staff with acute negligence leading to the death of around 125 cows in the animal shelter, but officials have denied the allegation.advertisementlast_img read more

Juno Finds Mysterious Unexpected Currents Crackling Through Jupiters Magnetosphere

first_img Science Fact or Fantasy? 20 Imaginary Worlds Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoAncestryThe Story Behind Your Last Name Will Surprise YouAncestryUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 minute and see why everyone is addictedVikings: Free Online GameUndoPrimeSolarQuotesCalifornia Signs Solar Law Helping Homeowners Save Hundreds A Month.PrimeSolarQuotesUndoQuizGrizThe Average Person Will Only Get 7 Right! What Will You Score?QuizGrizUndo The 18 Biggest Unsolved Mysteries in Physics 5 Mars Myths and Misconceptions There are turbulent, unexpected currents crackling through Jupiter’s atmosphere, producing brilliant auroras. Juno, the NASA probe that has orbited the gas giant since 2016, passes over Jupiter’s polar regions ever 53.5 days, collecting data on the magnetic forces that produce ultrabright auroras above the huge planet. In a new paper, published July 8 in the journal Nature Astronomy, researchers working with Juno’s data discovered that the electric currents passing through Jupiter’s magnetosphere — the region of its atmosphere richest with magnetic field lines — don’t act as expected. The probe found less direct current — current that constantly flows in one direction — than physicists predicted. It was only about 50 million amperes, an incredibly powerful current, but not as high as theoretical models of Jupiter’s magnetosphere suggested would be present. That finding suggests that “alternating current” — current that flickers back and forth — plays a much bigger role in producing Jupiter’s auroras than anyone realized, the researchers wrote. On Jupiter, as on Earth, auroras are a product of whirling currents in magnetic fields interacting with high-energy particles from the sun. [10 Places in the Solar System We’d Most Like to Visit]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65951-jupiter-currents-magnetosphere-tesla.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  “These observations, combined with other Juno spacecraft measurements, show that alternating currents play a much greater role in generating Jupiter’s aurora than the direct current system,” Joachim Saur, an author of the paper, said in a statement. On Earth, we typically think of alternating and direct currents (AC and DC) in terms of electronics. Famously, in the late 19th century, inventors Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla disagreed sharply over which method should be used to deliver power to electrical devices. DC power doesn’t convert as easily between different voltages, according to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), so Tesla wanted to turn the more-easily convertible AC into the standard. Edison, guarding his DC-dependant patents, resisted the change and spread misinformation that AC was more dangerous, according to the DOE. Tesla won out in the end, and AC became the standard for U.S. power plants. However, according to the DOE, direct current has regained favor as more battery-powered devices have come to market. Your lights are probably running on AC power, but there’s a good chance the device you’re reading this on relies on DC. (That’s why your laptop requires an AC adapter.) In the space around Jupiter, the proportion of AC to DC isn’t determined by feuding pre-modern inventors, but by the behavior of ions in the planet’s atmosphere. Jupiter has powerful currents than Earth for several reasons, including its huge size, its fast rate of spin and the excess of charged particles (ions) pumped out from volcanoes on the moon Io. That such a large proportion of those currents are AC seems to be a result of turbulence in the planet’s magnetic fields, the researchers wrote. Turbulence in this sense refers to the disordered way in which the magnetic fields’ shape and directionality fluctuates. And that turbulence is producing different effects at each of Jupiter’s two poles. In the time Juno has orbited Jupiter, the planet’s north pole has experienced about half the current of the south pole, the researchers wrote. That seems to be a result of the much more complex arrangement of magnetic field lines in the north, which interrupts the flow of currents. In the south, they wrote, the magnetic field lines are “smoother.” The effects of those differences are visible in the two poles’ auroras, they noted. In the north, the auroras tend to be more widely dispersed, with a structure of “filaments and flares.” In the south, the auroras tend to be more structured, with a “bright arc” extending out from the main oval where auroras occur. This research on Jupiter’s powerful magnetic fields, the researchers wrote, could inform their understanding of Earth’s weaker magnetic field — humanity’s main protection against harsh solar particles. Some researchers already suspected turbulence produced a significant proportion of currents around our planet. This work seems to lend credence to that idea.last_img read more

What Are GMOs and GM Foods

first_imgA genetically modified organism, or GMO, is an organism that has had its DNA altered or modified in some way through genetic engineering. In most cases, GMOs have been altered with DNA from another organism, be it a bacterium, plant, virus or animal; these organisms are sometimes referred to as “transgenic” organisms. Genetics from a spider that helps the arachnid produce silk, for example, could be inserted into the DNA of an ordinary goat. It sounds far-fetched, but that is the exact process used to breed goats that produce silk proteins in their goat milk, Science Nation reported. Their milk is then harvested, and the silk protein is then isolated to make a lightweight, ultrastrong silk material with a wide range of industrial and medical uses.Advertisement The dizzying range of GMO categories is enough to boggle the mind. CRISPR, a novel genome editing tool, has allowed geneticists to breed GMO pigs that glow in the dark by inserting jellyfish bioluminescence genetic code into pig DNA. CRISPR is opening doors to genetic modifications the likes of which were unimaginable just a decade ago. These are more comparatively wild examples, but GMOs are already very common in the farming industry. The most common genetic modifications are designed to create higher yield crops, more consistent products, and resist pests, pesticides and fertilizer. Genetically modified food According to the National Library of Medicine (part of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, or NCBI), genetically engineered, or GM, foods are those that have had foreign genes from other plants or animals inserted into their genetic codes. This has resulted in foods that are consistently flavored, as well as resistant to disease and drought. However, the NCBI also maintains a list of potential risks associated with GM foods, including genetic alterations that can cause environmental harm. Specifically, it’s possible that modified organisms could be inbred with natural organisms, leading to the possible extinction of the original organism. For instance, the banana tree is propagated entirely through cloning methods. The bananas themselves are sterile. By far, the biggest use of GMO technology is in large-scale agricultural crops. At least 90% of the soy, cotton, canola, corn and sugar beets sold in the United States have been genetically engineered. The adoption of herbicide-resistant corn, which had been slower in previous years, has accelerated, reaching 89% of U.S. corn acreage in 2014 and 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. One of the biggest draws for widespread adoption of GMO crops is pest resistance. According to the World Health Organization, one of the most widely used methods for incorporating pest resistance into plants is through Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) genetics, a bacterium that produces proteins that repel insects. GMO crops that are modified with the Bt gene have a proven resistance to insect pests, thus reducing the need for wide-scale spraying of synthetic pesticides. Are GMOs safe? Anti-GMO activists argue that GMOs can cause environmental damage and health problems for consumers. One such anti-GMO organization is the Center for Food Safety, which calls the genetic engineering of plants and animals potentially “one of the greatest and most intractable environmental challenges of the 21st century.” “Genetically modified foods have been linked to toxic and allergic reactions, sickness, sterile and dead livestock, and damage to virtually every organ studied in lab animals,” according to the Institute for Responsible Technology, a group of anti-GMO activists. “Most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe,” according to the Non-GMO Project. “In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs.” As You Sow is a nonprofit environmental watchdog focusing its research on how corporate actions affect our environment, including food production. According to Christy Spees, a program manager with As You Sow, GMO foods are dangerous “because the modifications are centered around resistance to toxic substances, such as pesticides and certain fertilizers. When dangerous chemicals are applied, plants use them to grow, and the food itself can be detrimental to our health.” Designer Plants Boost Crop Yields | VideoVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/40895-gmo-facts.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:0301:03Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:31Surgical Robotics00:29Video – Giggly Robot关闭  Learn more about the genetics behind GM foods, from the University of Utah. See how Americans are narrowly divided on their thoughts about GMO safety according to a recent Pew Research Center report. Read the WHO’s answers to frequently asked questions about GMOs.center_img This article was updated on July 8, 2019 by Live Science Contributor Mark Davis. by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoYahoo SearchThe Early Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes – Research Type 2 Diabetes TreatmentsYahoo SearchUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndo Why GMOs are good Many scientific organizations and industry groups agree that the fear-mongering that runs through discussions of GMO foods is more emotional than factual. “Indeed, the science is quite clear: crop improvement by the modern molecular techniques of biotechnology is safe,” the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) said in a 2012 statement. “The World Health Organization, the American Medical Association, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the British Royal Society, and every other respected organization that has examined the evidence has come to the same conclusion: Consuming foods containing ingredients derived from GM (genetically modified) crops is no riskier than consuming the same foods containing ingredients from crop plants modified by conventional plant improvement techniques,” according to the AAAS. Others point to the benefits of sturdier crops with higher yields. “GM crops can improve yields for farmers, reduce draws on natural resources and fossil fuels and provide nutritional benefits,” according to a statement on the website for Monsanto, the world’s largest manufacturer of GMOs. Monsanto and other agriculture companies have a financial stake in the research and messaging surrounding GM foods and have the resources to fund research that reinforces their narrative. However, although there are plenty of scientific data that demonstrates the safety, efficacy and resilience of GM crops, genetic modification remains a comparatively new scientific field. GMO labeling debate The argument over the development and marketing of GMO foods has become a political hot potato in recent years. In November 2015, the FDA issued a ruling that only requires additional labeling of foods derived from genetically engineered sources if there is a material difference — such as a different nutritional profile — between the GMO product and its non-GMO equivalent. The agency also approved AquaAdvantage Salmon, a salmon designed to grow faster than non-GMO salmon. According to Monsanto, “there is no scientific justification for special labeling of foods that contain GM ingredients. We support these positions and the FDA’s approach.” According to GMO Answers, an industry group comprised of Monsanto, DuPont, Dow AgroSciences, Bayer, BASF, CropScience and Syngenta, GMO agricultural products are “by far the most regulated and tested product in agricultural history.” Additionally, their website states that “many independent scientists and organizations around the world — such as the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, World Health Organization, American Medical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science — have looked at thousands of scientific studies and concluded that GM food crops do not pose more risks to people, animals or the environment than any other foods.” The political issue that GMOs have become is almost as conductive as the scientific debate. However, after much discussion among various lawmakers across the U.S., the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard (NBFDS) was passed into law at the beginning of 2019. According to the NBFDS current federal statutes, starting in 2020, all food must bear a BE (bioengineered) label if it contains more than 5% bioengineered material. States are free to impose their own labeling requirements as well, though it seems that most jurisdictions are waiting for federal laws to be implemented before working on new legislation. One thing is for certain: the scientific and political discussions surrounding GMO foods aren’t going away any time soon. Additional resources: last_img read more

Corporate India mourns the passing of a businessfriendly leader

first_imgCOMMENTS COMMENT SHARE Published on industry association India Inc mourned the death of DMK leader M Karunanidhi and five-time Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu by paying glowing tributes to his leadership, and more importantly, his passion to industrialise the State. “He strode the Indian political scene like a colossus for over five decades,” said Vice-Chairman & Managing Director of India Cements, N Srinivasan, who had a close association with Karunanidhi. “He wanted industrialisation of the State realising that it was the only way by which jobs would be created for the people. He had the knack of getting industry to support him at all time.”Srinivasan added that Karunanidhi was passionate about cricket and a big supporter of the Chennai Super Kings.“The country has lost a great visionary and dynamic and inspiring leader who had worked tirelessly for the upliftment of the underprivileged and ensured equitable socio-economic development for the people of Tamil Nadu,” said Rakesh Bharti Mittal, President, Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).He highlighted that during Karunanidhi’s tenures as chief minister , industrial growth in Tamil Nadu had progressed remarkably well.Chairman of the Mahindra group, Anand Mahindra tweeted recalling his various encounters with the DMK leader saying he was stuck by his informality, humour and hearty laugh.“My heart is heavy today… his passing away is a personal loss to me. He was always a supporter of my efforts to build India’s first corporate hospital,” said Prathap C Reddy, Chairman, Apollo Hospitals Group.Mourning the death of the DMK President, M Rafeeque Ahmed, former chairman of FICCI and CLE (Council for Leather Exports) pointed out that the former chief minister was instrumental in supporting the development of the Sriperumbudur-Oragadam corridor, which has now emerged into a global production centre. “The State has lost a great leader who supported the industry,” he said.P Murari, Advisor to President of FICCI, and former secretary to the President of India, said Tamil Nadu had lost one of the greatest literary and political personalities of this generation. “Truly, a great loss for the state. Even though he belonged to rationalist movement, MK was very secular in his approach and tolerated everybody,” he said.The Madras Chamber of Commerce and Industry said Karunanidhi was an able administrator and his contribution to the industrial development of the State was legendary.center_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL His commitment to industrialisation was deep, say business leaders August 07, 2018 politicslast_img read more

AP leads in skilled workforce Report

first_imgSHARE Published on November 22, 2018 According to the India Skills Report 2019 – a joint initiative of Wheebox, a global talent assessment company; PeopleStrong, an HR tech company; and the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) – Andhra Pradesh has topped the list of states with the highest employability in India.The employability level of B.Tech/ B.E graduates is 63.11 per cent as against last year’s 42.08 per cent; the employability level of MBA and polytechnic graduates stands low at 47.18 per cent and 45.90 per cent, but has shown a small improvement against last year’s levels (MBA 44.90 per cent; polytechnic 33.85 per cent).Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister, N. Chandrababu Naidu, said, “It is our vision to make AP the knowledge and skills hub of the country by facilitating the development of a robust skilling ecosystem of international standards. We are on a mission mode to enhance the employability skills of our students and unemployed youth to meet the skilled manpower demand from industry.”K. Sambasiva Rao, Managing Director and CEO of the AP State Skill Development Corporation, said, “APSSDC’s initiatives in providing market-driven training programmes are leading to the creation of a readily available talent pool to meet the skilled manpower needs of various sectors. Our focus is on structuring and delivering high quality, industry-relevant training courses to students and unemployed youth to enhance their employability quotient.”The India Skills Report said Andhra Pradesh is one of the preferred hiring destinations and one of the most preferred states for work by both men and women. The sixth edition of the India Skills Report captures insights and trends from the largest employability test that was spread out to 5,200 universities and professional institutions in India. The test reached out to more than 3 lakh students across 29 states and 7 union territories on the talent supply side, along with India hiring intent – a primary research survey on the talent demand side that reached out to over 100+ large employers across nine major industry verticals for talent demand. employment COMMENT Andhra Pradesh SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more